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Goldsborough of Maryland #6086 Sold

One of the most elegant Chinese export porcelain armorial services made for the American market, this pair of fluted rim plates is centered at the top of each rim with the Arms of Goldsborough, a great Maryland family whose prominent members included a lawyer and member of the Continental Congress, a Federalist governor of Maryland and a naval officer. The service is beautifully painted in famille rose enamels with central scenes of courtly Mandarin ladies taking their leisure on garden terraces, the elaborate borders with raspberry diapering, gilded reserves and exotic birds amongst branches and bamboo. Measuring 7 3/4″ in diameter and in very good condition. Circa 1800-1815.

Rare Pair of Orange Fitzhugh Eagle-Decorated Plates #6084 SOLD

A classic example of Chinese export porcelain made for the American market, this striking pair of hand-painted Orange Fitzhugh-patterned plates are centered with a finely rendered example of the American eagle based upon the Great Seal of the United States. Each eagle supporting an inscribed shield bearing the monogram of the patriotic original owner of this service, now, unfortunately, unknown. Measuring 9 3/4″ in diameter and in very good condition with only two minute rim frits to one plate. Circa 1820.

 

 

Rare American Market Derby Soup Plate #6088

A very fine example of Chinese export porcelain made for the early American republic, this beautiful soup plate is centered with a sepia image of HOPE and her anchor above a banner supported by palm fronds reading SPERO, the top of the rim centered with a gilded monogram of EHD for Elias Haskett Derby, one of the wealthiest and most prominent merchant traders of Salem, and, all of New England. This soup plate was part of the 272 piece service brought back by Derby from his maiden voyage to China in 1785-1786. Measuring 9″ in diameter and in very good condition. Examples to be found in the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem.

 

American Market Pair of Sepia Fitzhugh Warming Dishes #6057

A fine and rare pair of Chinese export porcelain Sepia Fitzhugh warming dishes, made for the American market, with a direct China Trade connection as they are from a service made for Richard Renshaw Thomson, a one time United States Consul to Canton and a son of a prominent Philadelphia China trader. The service, hand-painted in the elaborate Fitzhugh pattern bears a central roundel with Richard’s  initials. Measuring 10 3/4″ in diameter, both with small lines sealed, one with a virtually indiscernible glaze bubble, otherwise very good condition, and very finely rendered. Discussed in Philadelphia and the China Trade. Circa 1820. 1,450.00 each.

 

Sepia Fitzhugh American Market Cider Jug #6074 SOLD

A great desirable form made for the American market, this especially attractive strap-handled cider jug is meticulously hand-rendered in the Sepia Fitzhugh pattern, bearing an inscribed roundel under the spout bearing the initial “H”for HONE. From a service  made for John Hone II on the occasion of his marriage to Marie Antoinette Kane in 1818. The family’s history is fully discussed in New York and the China Trade, page 116. Restoration to a chip to the rim of the cover, otherwise, very good condition with a foo lion finial with great detail and personality-a piece of sculpture in miniature. 10 1/2″ tall. Circa 1820.

 

Green Fitzhugh 6 3/8″ American Eagle Plate #6039 SOLD

A very finely painted Chinese export porcelain 6 3/8″ plate made for the American market, vibrantly decorated in the Green Fitzhugh pattern and centered with an image of a spread eagle, based upon an early image of the Great Seal of the United States. The symbolic bird bears the E Pluribus Unum scroll in its beak, as well as supporting a shield inscribed with the gilded initials of the plate’s first owner, as yet unidentified. With a line to the reverse rim and some rim roughness restored, otherwise good condition with no restoration to the image of the eagle. Circa 1820.

 

American Market Thomson 15 3/4″Platter #6055

A piece from a fine group of Chinese export porcelain we have at present from a service made for Richard Renshaw Thomson of Philadelphia, son of a prominent China trading family and one time American Consul to Canton. Beautifully rendered sepia Fitzhugh, centered with Thomson’s monogram. Good condition with only slight stacking wear. Circa 1820.     $2000.

American Market Thomson Tureen and Stand #6053

An impressive and handsome Chinese export porcelain covered tureen and stand, made for the American market, with a Philadelphia connection; from a service having been ordered for Richard Renshaw Thomson, son of a prominent Philadelphia China trader, and himself a one time American consul to Canton. Very finely hand-rendered sepia Fitzhugh with gilded handles and finial, and bearing Thomson’s monogram. Measuring 11″ tall x 14″ across, and in very good condition. Truly a centerpiece for any American market collection or table. Circa 1820.

Classic Orange Fitzhugh American Eagle Plate #6060 SOLD

A great example of Chinese export eagle decorated ware for the American market, this vibrant Orange Fitzhugh-patterned  7 3/4″ plate is centered with a fine rendition of the American eagle based upon the Great Seal of the United States, supporting a striped shield, clutching the olive branch of peace and the arrows of war, the “E PLURIBUS UNUM” banner in his beak. Very good condition. Circa 1800-1810.

 

Thomson American Market Sepia Fitzhugh #6056

large and impressive Chinese export porcelain oval warming dish, finely hand-painted in the sepia Fitzhugh pattern and bearing a central roundel with the initials RRT for Richard Renshaw Thomson (1799-1824). Thomson was the son of a prominent Philadelphia China trader, Edward Thomson, serving as an agent on his father’s behalf, as well as American consul in Canton. Several services for this family exist and they are discussed in Philadelphia and the China Trade, pages 152-153. Accompanying this fine dish is a cover from one of those other services bearing the initials of a Richard’s brother, John Renshaw Thomson, who also served in Canton as consul, appointed by President Monroe. Both pieces are  in very good condition with only slight wear. Measuring 11 1/4″ x 16″.