Group of English Armorial Fitzhugh Porcelain #7481-7484

A very fine group of special order Chinese export porcelain hand-painted in the Blue Fitzhugh pattern and made for the English market, each piece bearing the ARMS of HILL DAWE quartering MOORE, LEWES AND SELWYNE. Discussed on page 645, vol. II in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain. Brilliant cobalt blue with contrasting gilding and polychrome central armorial. Very good condition, circa 1795.  10″, 8″ and 6″ plates along with a sauceboat and undertray. Priced individually.

Japanese Arita Dame-Au-Parasol Charger #7472

A rather unusual Japanese Arita porcelain 12 1/2″ charger decorated in an interpretation of the well-known Dame-Au Parasol pattern. The origin of this very Asian design started in the Netherlands when the Dutch East India Company commissioned an artist, Cornelius Pronk to create some designs that the company could order on export porcelain. This pattern appears in both Chinese and Japanese wares and it has always been a point of speculation as to why a European trading company hired a Dutch artist to design Asian images to be rendered on Asian porcelain by Chinese and Japanese painters?! In any event, the result is both charming and beautiful, in very good condition with only a chip to the reverse filled. Mid-18th century.

Magnificent Qianlong Period Famille Rose Floor Vase #7480c

A really fine Chinese export porcelain covered baluster floor vase with decoration as impressive as its size. Beautifully hand-painted in Famille Rose enamels with a pair of pheasants perched upon rockwork amongst a profusion of flowering peony branches, the shoulder with a richly diapered and ruyi collar border, the motif continued on the cover which is surmounted by an especially gleeful foo lion finial. Measuring 27″ tall x 14″ wide. In especially good condition, a truly lovely object. Qianlong period, 1736-1796.

 

 

Kangx Period – Pair of Hunting Scene Plates #7478

Thinly potted and decorated in the richest underglaze cobalt blue, this pair of generously-sized scalloped rim plates measure 10″ in diameter and are hand-painted with a central scene of a mounted man and woman  out hunting within a landscape, all within a rim bordered with “penciled” stylized lotus. The reverse also with stylized lotus around the rim and centered with a Chenghua mark. Illustrated and discussed in David Howard’s book, The Choice of the Private Trader, page 42, where he notes that the Chenghua mark (1465-1487) was not intended as a forgery, but rather a compliment to the quality of the piece, and, was used to replace the Kangxi mark as the emperor had forbidden the use of his name on porcelain for export after 1782.  Other than the usual minor rim frits one expects with pieces of this age, they are in excellent condition. Circa 1690. Ex-Mario Buatta Collection. $1450. each

Pair of Chinese Export Pewter Ginger Jars #7475

A handsome and very decorative pair of Chinese export pewter ginger jars of lobed form, hand-decorated with scrolling foliate decoration against a punch work/stippled background. Measuring 9″ tall x 8″ wide and with a small dent to one of the lobes- otherwise in very good condition and displaying well-the understated decoration and neutral grey body would work well in a contemporary interior. Late 19th century. $550/pair.

 

Charming! Pair of Kangxi Shoe-Shaped Brush Washers #7476 SOLD

A very charming pair of diminutive Chinese porcelain brush washers modeled in the form of Chinese shoes cast with relief detailing of black against a green enamel ground. In Chinese culture, shoes symbolize wealth as their shape resembles silver ingots. And, in combination with a mirror, they mean “together and in harmony”.  This harmonious little pair measuring 3 1/2″ long is in very good condition with only a slight hairline to the interior of one shoe. Kangxi period, circa  1700.

Yongzheng Period Koi Decorated Plate #7459

A fine Chinese export porcelain plate decorated in Famille Rose enamels with images of koi  swimming about the center within a cavetto with a very elaborate gilded scrolling border, the outer rim with landscape vignettes alternating with with gilded branches of peony-all exquisitely rendered as one expects to find during this period of superb porcelain production. The koi is a symbol of conjugal harmony and happiness as they are believed to mate for life. Measuring 9″ in diameter with a line to the rim, otherwise very good condition. Circa 1730-1735.