E-Newsletter Sign Up

Copyright 2020 Polly Latham Asian Art
All Rights Reserved

Two Pairs of Fine Mandarin Plates #7455 A,B Sold

Two pairs of very well-painted Chinese export porcelain 8″ plates rendered in Famille Rose enamels, all depicting colorful and detailed Mandarin scenes within elaborate raspberry-enameled diapered borders with exotic bird vignettes and gilded highlights. Pair ‘A’ features a lady of some importance being pushed about a garden in a wheel chair with a parasol while being greeting by officials, along with a second plate depicts a lady with her attendant being approached  in a landscape by a messenger or supplicant of some sort. Pair ‘B’ offers a plate with a pair of scholars seated at a marble table on an outdoor terrace about to be served their tea, along with another plate painted with a noble lady seated on a root chair with her attendants in an elaborate hall, listening to a musician perform upon the guzheng. Note the detail of the marble screen behind her, the elaborate floor tiles and even the miniature tray garden near the musician-a remarkable snapshot of life! Measuring 8″ in diameter and in very good condition with only the exception of slight stacking wear commensurate with age. Circa 1820.

PAIR A

 

 

PAIR B

 

 

 

Superb Transitional/Kangxi Period Brushpot #7446 Sold

A truly beautiful form, and superbly decorated in underglaze blue, this Chinese porcelain brush pot of simple flared cylindrical form is hand-painted with figures in a landscape being viewed from an attendant in a window and a scholar’s studio with his desk visible through an open door.  Excellent condition. Chenghua mark on the bottom as well as an old Chait collection sticker. Circa 1640-1660.

 

 

Pair of Vaughan Hallowell Armorial Soup Plates #7441c SOLD

A superb pair of Chinese export porcelain octagonal armorial soup plates of interest to both American and English market collectors as it is one of three services made for Samuel Vaughan, an English merchant and planter in Jamaica, who married Bostonian Sarah Hallowell in 1747.  They relocated to England, but a large portion of the service returned to America after the Revolution when part of the family moved to Hallowell, Maine where they played a prominent role in settling the area in the new republic.  Each piece centered with the arms of Vaughan impaling Hallowell, finely painted, the rims of the plates scattered with floral sprigs, illustrated and discussed on page 576 in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. II. Each measuring 8 1/2″ across; one with two small rim chips on the reverse filled, the other with glaze lines on the reverse which do not show through, otherwise splendid enamels in good condition. Circa 1770.

 

 

Rare Equestrian Hunting Punch Bowl #7425 SOLD

A rather rare Chinese export porcelain punch bowl decorated with equestrian hunting motifs, finely painted with two sepia roundels depicting huntsmen with their horses and hounds, alternating with two roundels depicting country house landscapes. The images and bowl rim edged with overglaze blue and gilded borders, the bottom interior with a basket of flowers design. It is suggested that these bowls were made for export to not only England but also for the American mid-Atlantic and southern colonies where the English aristocratic lifestyle with pursuits, such a fox hunting, was emulated. This is a fine example measuring 13 1/2″ in diameter with three lines restored, otherwise in very good condition, especially the finely rendered scenes-most likely taken from engravings of the period.  A similar example in the collections at Winterthur. Circa 1785.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pair of Extremely Rare Thomas Jefferson Pots-de-Creme #7437 Sold

A truly extraordinary example of Chinese export porcelain made for the American market, this beautiful pair of  covered pots-de-cremes is from a service made for our third, and one of our greatest, American presidents, Thomas Jefferson. The pattern-a simple underglaze blue spearhead border with gilded highlights, typical of the aesthetic of the Federal period-is augmented with an armorial crest surmounted by knight’s helmet flanked by flourishes and bellflower swags above a shield centered with a gilded initial J.  With a long history of descent in the Jefferson family, this service was auctioned off after Jefferson’s death in 1826 by his granddaughter Ellen Wayles Randolph, part of a massive sale of personal property made necessary by the staggering debt in which Jefferson left his estate. The service was later reacquired by Ellen Randolph’s grandson for the family and pieces were eventually lent out to various public collections for exhibition; four pieces were donated to the White House in 1906 and are still in their possession. It has been suggested that Governor and Mrs. Christopher Gore of Massachusetts, while on a diplomatic mission to London, ordered the service for President Jefferson as they ordered an identical one for themselves with the initial G. With many thanks to Becky McGuire, Christies, New York for her research. This specific pair of pots-de-creme has a history of descent in the family of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge of Boston. Both pieces in fine condition, measuring 3″ tall. Circa 1800-1810.

Kangxi Period Famille Verte Lotus Dish #7447 Sold

A very beautiful Chinese export porcelain 9″ lotus-form dish decorated in Famille Verte enamels with a central scene of flowering peony amongst rockwork, the theme continued on a smaller scale filling each lotus petal panel around the rim of the dish.  We have had these dishes with the design painted in underglaze blue many times over the past years but this is the first example we’ve enjoyed in this striking color palette. Measuring 9″ across, and with two pieces out of the rim of restored perfectly, otherwise fine condition. Circa 1700-1710.

 

 

Impressive Scottish “Arms of Grant” Platter and Mazzarene #7444 Sold

A beautiful Chinese export porcelain armorial platter and mazzarene, measuring 13″ x 16″, finely hand-painted in vibrant Famille Rose enamels with courtly Mandarin scenes, both scenes centered at the top with the Grant coat-of arms, and both with an outer border with elaborately rendered flowers and butterflies. Made to delight and impress with its richness, from a service most likely made for Sir William Grant who married in 1811. Illustrated and discussed in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, vol. I, page 1002. In very good condition, circa 1815-1820.

 

 

 

 

 

American Market 10 1/4″ Ship Punch Bowl #7440 Sold

With a rather rare American ship decoration, this fine  Chinese export porcelain punch bowl is centered front and back with a hand-painted image of a three-masted  frigate or sloop flying what is referred to as a Jack Flag with a navy blue ground with gold stars. This flag was flown on our ships from 1777 until 1916 and designated the presence of an ambassador or minister of the diplomatic corps on board. This bowl has a mate in the Reeves Collection and is illustrated and discussed on page 212 of Thomas Litzenburg, Jr.’s book Chinese Export Porcelain in the Reeves Collection at Washington and Lee University. Measuring 10 1/4″ in diameter and dating to circa 1795. Two lines and restoration.

 

 

 

 

Pair of Kangxi Period Tea Bowls and Saucers #7445 sold

A very fine pair of Kangxi Chinese export porcelain tea bowls and saucers, decorated in underglaze blue “penciled” designs, each piece laid out in stylized lotus petal panels, each panel with a tree and flower silhouette-all “penciled” in with lattice cross-hatching. Exquisitely thinly potted, with only very minute rim nibbles, very good condition, the saucers measuring 4 1/2″ in diameter.  Circa 1690.

 

 

 

Elegant Yongzheng Famille Rose Plate #7451 SOLD

A fine Chinese export porcelain Yongzheng period plate, hand-painted with Famille Rose enamels with a scene of a pair of pheasants perched amongst rockwork and flowering peony within a finely rendered gilded foliate cavetto, the rim with flowering branches and butterflies. The pheasant was the symbol of refinement and would have been a perfect choice of subject for such a refined piece as this with it’s muted tones and perfectly balanced white space-all so typical of the Yongzheng period. The plate measuring 9″ in diameter and, other than a Y-shaped line to the glaze on the reverse, it is in good condition. Circa 1730-35.

 

 

 

CA MAU Shipwreck Tea Bowls and Saucers #7437 SOLD

 

A real treasure, truly, this beautifully intact pair of Chinese export porcelain tea bowls and saucers are part of the famous Ca Mau shipwreck cargo that was discovered in 1998 off the coast of south Vietnam. It was  the remains of an early 18th century Chinese junk carrying approximately 130,000 pieces of porcelain on it’s way from Canton to the Dutch port of Batavia (now Jakarta) when it sunk in about 1725. After the cargo was retrieved and catalogued, three Vietnamese museums chose what they wanted for their collections, the remaining 76,000 pieces were sold in a spectacular sale at Sotheby’s in Amsterdam in 2007 that garnered worldwide attention.  Pieces from this shipwreck, needless to say, are sometimes damaged or somewhat degraded having been under salt water for nearly three centuries, but these two examples remain in extraordinarily good condition, finely potted, charmingly hand-painted in underglaze blue, and with much of their original glaze more intact than what one usually sees on these shipwreck pieces. The saucers 4 1/2″ in diameter, the tea bowls 2 3/4″ in diameter. All pieces bearing the Sotheby’s sale stickers; an opportunity to own a piece of a time capsule of the China Trade.  Circa 1725.

 

 

 

 

American Ship Tea Caddy and Cover #7418A Sold

A nice example of Chinese export porcelain made for the American market, this dome-shouldered tea caddy is hand-painted on both sides with an image of a three-masted ship under sail, proudly flying two American flags. Small restoration to cover and neck, otherwise good condition. Measuring 4 1/4″ tall x 3″ wide. Circa 1800.

Rare American Market “Cow Pox” 5 1/2″ Bowl #7434 SOLD

A charming Chinese export porcelain 5 1/2″ bowl made for the American market, from a tea service ordered by Dr. Benjamin Waterhouse of Cambridge, MA. (1754-1846). Inscribed with the gilded initial W within a chain-link bordered roundel featuring the images of two cows in a pasture. The bucolic imagery was not only decorative but also an advertisement for innoculation by cowpox as a preventative vaccine against smallpox. Though the innoculation had been known since early in the 18th century, it was still a very controversial procedure (as it remains today). Dr. Waterhouse innoculated his own children with this method and commemorated the event with a special order tea set. Discussed and illustrated in Schiffer’s China for America, page 174. This bowl most likely the slop bowl from the tea set, with three lines restored, but charming imagery beautifully intact. Circa 1800.

 

Yongzheng Period English Armorial Tea Bowl and Saucer #7426 Sold

A very elegant Yongzheng period, Chinese export porcelain tea bowl and saucer, very thinly potted with scrolling gilded foliate borders, both pieces centered with meticulously painted armorial of very elaborate design representing the Arms of Baker quartering Cholmley impaling Bateman. David Howard suggests that this service was most likely made for Richard Baker who purchased the estate of Orsett Hall in Essex about 1747. This is one of four services ordered with these arms which demonstrates the prestige and status of Chinese porcelain in English-and European- society at this time. Circa 1735. The saucer measuring 4 1/2″ in diameter and both pieces in very good condition. Illustrated and discussed in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. I, page 294.  Formerly in the K.R. Rizk Collection.

 

 

 

 

Superb Pair of Vaughan Hallowell Plates with Original Bookplate #7427 SOLD

A very handsome pair of Chinese export porcelain octagonal form plates, meticulously hand-painted en grisaille with the Arms of Vaughan impaling Hallowell within an elaborate rococo style cartouche and inscribed beneath Samuel Vaughan, the plate rims with delicate bird and landscape vignettes. This is one of three services made for this family and it holds both interesting English and American connections. Samuel Vaughan was a wealthy merchant and Jamaican plantation owner who married Sarah Hallowell of Boston in 1747. Their son, Benjamin Vaughan, though he couldn’t attend elite schools in England because the family were Unitarians, managed to be tutored by famous scientist Joseph Priestly and later graduated from Edinburgh University with a degree in medicine. By the time he had immigrated to Hallowell, Maine in 1799 to land inherited from his mother, he had made the acquaintance of Benjamin Franklin, John Jay and John Adams. Living in remote Maine, he managed to keep a library of similar size to Harvard’s and he garnered degrees from both Harvard and Bowdoin College.                                                                                                                                                                          The plates are in remarkably fine condition, with virtually no wear to the delicate grisaille decoration which was finely rendered to resemble the bookplate engraving that had been sent to Canton to copy. The bookplate, which is in fine condition and suitably framed, is not only an interesting design source pertaining to the commission of the dinner service, but itself was designed by Thomas Chippendale!                                                                                                      The plates are illustrated and discussed in Schiffer’s China for America, page 34, as well as Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, vol. I, page 359.                From a private Boston, Beacon Hill collection.   Circa 1750.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rare Pronk Tea Bowl #7435 Sold

A charming little object, this finely potted Chinese export porcelain tea bowl is decorated in the rare “Plume” pattern in iron red against a black diapered ground. This is one of two versions of this design; the other can be found in lavender and yellow enamels. Both versions were after a small group of designs commissioned by the Dutch East India Company from Dutch artist Cornelius Pronk, to be sent to China and reproduced on porcelain. This is one of the few instances where we can trace a Chinese porcelain design back to an actual European source. Very good condition. Circa 1745.

Fine Qianlong Period English Armorial Tea Bowl and Saucer #7427 SOLD

A  fine Chinese export porcelain armorial tea bowl and saucer very well-painted in Famille Rose enamels with gilded spearhead border, both pieces bearing the Arms of Barrington, Viscount Barrington, with Lovell in pretence. This specific service was made for the 2nd Viscount Barrington, William Wildman (1717-1793) who occupied several high positions in government including Secretary of War and Chancellor of the Exchequer. The viscount’s crown figures predominantly as the crest of the arms and on the reverse of the tea bowl. Minor frits filled and two lines to the saucer and one to the tea bowl sealed, otherwise good condition. Illustrated and discussed in Howard’s Chinese Export Porcelain, Vol. II, page 300. This piece formerly in the K. R. Rizk Collection. Circa 1745.

 

 

 

 

 

American Market Ship Teapot #7415 Sold

An exceptional Chinese export porcelain drum form teapot with a double strap handle from a service made for the American market decorated with a hand-painted rendering of a three masted ship flying two American flags. There are several ship-decorated services from this early period of the American China trade and this version is considered one of the finest. From the former collection of Elinor Gordon and once exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Slight crazing to some small areas,  line sealed across base. Circa 1810.

 

Qianlong Period Famille Rose/Noire-Bordered Plate #7421 SOLD

A striking Chinese export porcelain barbed rim plate, decorated in Famille Rose enamels with a central scene of a fisherman handing a fish into a lady’s basket as she, her child and attendant stand beneath a large peony tree on a stream bank. The surrounding border comprised of alternating floral panels, vibrantly colored, the enamel sitting proud of the surface, all set off by a contrasting black ground. Measuring 9 1/2″ in diameter, with only a small Y-shaped line on the reverse sealed, otherwise a very good condition and dating to circa 1745. Illustrated in Williamson’s book on Famille Rose.

 

 

 

Elegant Pair of SETON Armorial Leaf-Form Dishes #7398c Sold

A beautiful form, this pair of Chinese export porcelain leaf-form armorial dishes is decorated in the striking Orange Fitzhugh pattern and is centered with the Arms of Seton quartering Hay. One of four services made for this prominent family of East India merchants-Sir Alexander Seton and three of his sons all being “Company men”. Illustrated and discussed in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. II, page 541. Very good condition with only gilding wear to the stem of one. 7″ long. Circa 1810.

 

Fine Pair of Mandarin Plates #7410 Sold

An especially attractive pair of Chinese export porcelain 8″ plates decorated in Famille Rose enamels, each with hand-painted Mandarin scenes of courtly figures, the border especially detailed with lattice work designs alternating with flower baskets and chrysanthemum blossoms all against a scrolling green foliate ground. The richness of detail and vibrant enamels make this pair truly remarkable. Both in very good condition. Circa 1810.

 

 

 

 

Boating Scene 8″ Mandarin Plate #7411 Sold

A lovely Chinese export porcelain 8″ plate, decorated in Famille Rose enamels, hand-painted with a wonderful view of two boats upon the water within a finely detailed floral, bird, and butterfly border  typical of what one expects to see on quality pieces from this period. Very good condition. Circa 1810.

 

 

 

American Market “Quaker and Cow” Tea Bowl #7433 Sold

An especially fine example in superb condition, this Chinese export porcelain tea bowl is decorated en grisaille in the “Quaker and Cow” pattern. This design has a long association with the Philadelphia Hollingsworth-Morris family, one Mary Hollingsworth Morris having sent a drawing to Canton which was interpreted onto a tea service. There are several versions of this design, this one being one of the finest quality with the hand-painted detail coming close to the precision of an engraved transfer print. The bowl measuring 2″ tall by 3 1/2″ in diameter, and in great condition. See Schiffer’s China in America, pages 172-173. Circa 1810.

American Market Ship Tea Caddy # 7418B sold

Another good example from our collection of Chinese export porcelains made for the early American Market, this fine dome shouldered tea caddy is hand-painted on both sides with an image a three-masted ship, its sails furled, flying two American flags of the early republic. Measuring 4″ tall x 3″ wide and with slight crazing and a small restoration to the neck; otherwise very good condition and a fine example of an image from our early maritime history.  Circa 1800.

M

Pair of Sepia Fitzhugh 7 1/2″ Plates #7413 SOLD

 

A charming pair of Chinese export porcelain 7 1/2″ plates decorated in the Sepia Fitzhugh pattern, meticulously hand-painted with a unusual floral sprigs within the central medallion. Very good condition with an Elinor Gordon provenance. Circa 1800-1820.

 

 

 

American Market “Mt. Vernon” 7 1/4″ Plate #7432 Sold

A rare Chinese export porcelain 7 1/4″ plate made for the American Market, decorated en grisaille with a central scene of George Washington’s Mt. Vernon, surrounded by a grisaille grapevine border with gilded details. From a tea service made for Captain Daniel Bacon of Boston and Barnstable, MA, a wealthy trader and merchant, and owner of  the renown  Game Cock, one of the fastest ships in it’s day.  The image of Mt. Vernon was taken from a period engraving, after a painting of the President’s home. The somber color scheme, part of a cult of mourning in the years following Washington’s death. The grapevine border after a popular English ceramic design of the period. Illustrated and discussed in Schiffer’s China in America, pages 168-170. Very good condition. Circa 1810-1820.   

 

 

Fine PAIR of 12 1/2″ Kangxi Chargers #7422 sold

A very handsome pair of Chinese export Kanxgi period chargers, decorated in a rich cobalt blue with central roundels of scenes of a supplicant before a nobleman or court official surrounded by attendants.  Representations of the Four Seasons emanate from the central scene in the form of peony, prunus, chrysanthemum and lotus. The rim contains a border of continuous scenes depicting figures at leisure enjoying courtly and scholarly pursuits.  The reverse of these lovely pieces are equally beautiful, decorated with continuing floral motifs both on the rim as well as the cavetto. Measuring 12 1/2″ in diameter and in very good condition with only a minor rim chip to one charger. Beautifully painted. circa 1690.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

American Market Ship Cups #7416 SOLD

Three charming Chinese export porcelain handled cups made for the American market, each hand-painted with images of three masted ships all flying American flags. Each measuring approximately 2 1/2″ tall, the bigger one of the three with a slightly larger diameter. All bearing collection labels from Elinor Gordon, having been exhibited in the Baltimore Museum of Art.  Wonderful examples of America’s early maritime trade. Lines sealed, otherwise good condition. One of the pair of cups is sold. Circa 1800.

 

 

 

Impressive PAIR of Jardinieres and Stands #7291 SOLD

A very fine, and very useful, pair of Chinese export porcelain jardinieres and stands of impressive size, decorated in Famille Rose enamels, each side hand-painted with a courtly Mandarin scene within quatrefoil, circular, peach, or pomegranate-shaped  roundels, floral sprigs and border, and each jardiniere resting within a footed tray with floral branch designs. The jardinieres measuring approximately 10″ high (with their stands) and 10″ square (the opening 8 1/2″ square. Very good condition and dating to the 19th century.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pair of American Market Green Fitzhugh Soup Plates SOLD

A handsome pair of Chinese export porcelain 9″ soup plates decorated in a brilliant Green Fitzhugh pattern, each centered with a gilded S, from a service made for the Spooner family of Plymouth, a prominent family whose 18th century house still stands today as a museum. Very good condition. Early 19th century.

 

Tobacco Leaf 6 1/2″ Plate #7431 Sold

A charming 6 1/2″ Chinese export porcelain scalloped rim plate, decorated in Famille Rose enamels in the exuberant and much-sought-after Tobacco Leaf pattern.  Very good condition with only slight stacking wear. Circa 1760-1780.

 

 

Tobacco Leaf Tea Caddy #7430 sold

This Chinese export porcelain dome-shouldered covered tea caddy is a really great form in very the popular Tobacco Leaf pattern. Hand-painted in this vibrantly colored and exuberantly designed pattern, this piece measures 5 1/2″ tall x 3 1/2″ wide and, with the exception of some restoration to the finial, is in very good condition. Dating to circa 1760-1780.

 

 

Qianlong Period English Armorial Handled Cup and Saucer #7429 SOLD

A lovely Chinese export porcelain handled cup and saucer made for the English market with a gilded spearhead border, each piece centered with a finely hand-painted Famille Rose armorial for the Rich family of Lancashire. From a service most likely made for one Major Rich who served in the military establishment of the government of Bombay (died 1759).  Illustrated and discussed in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. II, page 300.  Extremely faint glaze line to the reverse of the saucer, otherwise great condition. The saucer measuring 4 1/2″ in diameter, the cup 2 1/2″ tall. Circa 1755.  $750.

 

 

Qianlong Period English Armorial Tea Bowl and Saucer #7428 SOLD

An exquisite example of Chinese export armorial porcelain made for the English market, this lovely tea bowl and saucer are decorated in Famille Rose enamels with the elaborate Arms of Bigland quartering Errington and Barrington impaling Wilkins and Weir.  The arms represents those of Ralph Bigland (died 1784) and those of his two wives’ families, hence the very ornate image which proved a bit too much for the Chinese decorator who painted them somewhat incorrectly on the tea bowl! Illustrated and discussed in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. I, page 508. Beautiful quality and condition. The saucer measuring 4 /12″ in diameter. Circa 1760, the year the arms were confirmed. $750.00

 

 

 

American Ship Sugar Bowl #7344 Sold

From a rare group of identifiable Chinese export porcelain teawares made for the American market, decorated en grisaille,  with a central image of a neoclassical urn resting upon a plinth inscribed with the monogram JB for Captain John Barton  (1774-1818) of Salem, Massachusetts. To the right, is a swagged shield bearing the image of an anchor (the sailor’s symbol of Hope) with two love birds resting upon it, a cartouche below bearing the initials of the captain’s wife LB. And to the left, most remarkably, is the partial image of his ship, flying an American flag, with the stern inscribed ARAB.  This pattern appears on other services-some bearing a British flag, some with inscribed monograms-but seldom does it ever have so much identifiable information as to the ship’s name and captain, let alone his wife. This was a very specific commission, in good condition and dating to circa 1800-1810.

 

Pair of Rouge de Fer 11″ Plates SOLD

A fine pair of Chinese export porcelain Rouge de Fer 11″ plates elegantly decorated with a bird perched upon a flowering branch of peony, the central scene encircled with a border of bianco-sopra-bianco decoration of peony and phoenix motifs, painstakingly carved into the porcelain when the clay is still leather-hard before firing. One plate restored, the other in good condition. Late Kangxi period, circa 1720.

 

 

 

 

 

Great Set of Mandarin Plates #7408 Priced Individually Sold

A rather attractive set of Chinese export porcelain “borderless plates”, decorated in Famille Rose enamels with courtly Mandarin scenes.  Each vignette rendered across the entire surface of the plate, treating the subject more like a painting than an enclosed view as one sees on many plate designs. Each image different, with a richly enameled and detailed scene full of narrative. Measuring 7 3/4″ in diameter and in very good condition with only the slightest area of stacking wear on two of them-barely discernible-and all dating to circa 1820.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beautiful Yongzheng/Qianlong Armorial Plate #7406 Sold

A rather fine Chinese export porcelain armorial plate hand-decorated in Famille Rose enamels with a rather unusual central diamond-form medallion with the image of a bee. The arms are those of d’Arvincourt with de Gergy accollee. The richly diapered raspberry border is broken with alternating cartouches bearing the family’s arms and crests. Measuring 9″ in diameter and in very good condition with the exception of two very small areas retouched on the rim border. Late Yongzheng/early Qianlong, circa 1737.

 

 

 

 

 

Mandarin Plate #7384c Sold

Another fine Mandarin plate from our collection, this 7 3/4″ Chinese export porcelain plate is hand-painted with a central scene of courtly figures chatting beneath a tree upon a garden terrace overlooking the water. The border elaborately painted with various animal and dragon vignettes. Very good condition. Circa 1820.

 

 

 

Mandarin Plate #7385c Sold

An attractive 7 3/4″ Chinese export porcelain plate decorated in Famille Rose enamels with a central Mandarin scene of two courtly figures meeting upon a riverbank, the border with vignettes of dragons, deer, butterflies and water fowl. Very good condition. Circa 1820.

 

 

 

 

Unusual Size American Market Cider Jug #7405 SOLD

An unusually small and very attractive Chinese export porcelain strap-handled cider jug made for the American market with a finely rendered sepia rose border, highlighted with bands of peach-colored enamel and gilding, the matching cover surmounted by a gilded foo lion. With the exception of very minor wear to the gilding the piece is in very good condition, the decoration similar to a well-known American market service made for the Van Rensselaer family of New York. Measuring 8″ tall and dating to circa 1810.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kangxi Period 11″ Charger #7396 sold

A fine Chinese export porcelain 11″ charger, decorated in underglaze blue with a central design of scrolling peonies against a blue ground, the motif continuing around the rim which is painted with lotus petal-shaped panels with flowering branches of peony and diapering along a shaped edge. With very minor frits and glaze bubbles, otherwise very good condition. The reverse with a collection sticker from The Cowperthwaite Family Trust.  Circa 1690.

 

 

Double Color Fitzhugh Plate #7403 SOLD

A fine Chinese export porcelain 9 1/2″ dinner plate hand-decorated in the Fitzhugh pattern in the rare combination of brown and green enamels. The pattern developed into having seven basic colors of varying rarity, and then also was decorated in several unusual combinations of colors such as we have in this piece. Note the quality of the hand-painting and detail. Other than a line in the plate, it is in good condition, in a bold combination of enamels, and dates to circa 1820.

Superb Pseudo-Tobacco Leaf Platter #7390 SOLD

From a choice selection we have at present, this very fine Chinese export porcelain oval platter of impressive size, measuring 15″ across, is hand-painted in the exuberant Pseudo-Tobacco Leaf  with floral and foliate designs in rich enamels with gilded highlights. In very good condition and dating to circa 1760-1780.

 

 

 

 

Great Raspberry Fitzhugh Plate #7402

A richly beautiful Chinese export porcelain plate decorated in the rare Raspberry Fitzhugh pattern with a gilded central landscape roundel and scrolling vine band within the cavetto. The classic Fitzhugh pattern developed seven different basic colors, and color combinations, some of them rarer than others, Raspberry being one of the rarer more sought-after shades as there were only a few services made with this enameling. Measuring 9 1/2″ in diameter and in very good condition, with a Henry Moog provenance and dating to circa 1800.

 

 

 

Pair of 6″ Pseudo-Tobacco Leaf Plates #7391 SOLD

From a group of Pseudo-Tobacco Leaf porcelain we now have in our collection, this fine pair of Chinese export porcelain hand-painted 6″ plates in the exuberant Pseudo-Tobacco Leaf pattern is brilliantly enameled  with foliate and floral designs. One of several versions of the famous Tobacco Leaf pattern, these charming plates are in very good condition and date to circa 1760-1780.

 

 

Kangxi Famille Verte Covered Jar #7394 Sold

A beautiful diminutive Chinese export porcelain Kangxi period covered jar, decorated in Famille Verte enamels with four panels of flowering branches around the exterior of the body and small diapered bands around the neck and cover. Lovely quality, in very good condition and measuring 5 1/2″ tall. Ex-Chait collection provenance. Circa 1700.

Fine Pseudo-Tobacco Leaf Soup Plates #7389 SOLD

 

From a collection we have at present, this very attractive group of four Chinese export porcelain soup plates finely hand-decorated in the exuberant Pseudo-Tobacco Leaf pattern with floral and foliate designs. Measuring 9″ in diameter, in very good condition measuring, and dating to circa 1760-1780.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yongzheng Period Pair of ‘Quail’ Soup Plates #6050 SOLD

A very refined pair of Chinese export porcelain soup plates, decorated in famille rose enamels with central scenes of a pair of quails beneath branches of peony, chrysanthemum, prunus and bamboo, the cavetto encircled with a yellow spearhead border, and the rim delicately hand-painted with bianco-sopra-bianco branches of flowers and bamboo, the outer edge with a band of famille rose enamel floral motifs. The quail is a symbol of strength. Measuring 9″ in diameter, nd in very good condition. Yongzheng period, circa 1730-1735.

 

 

American Market Brown Fitzhugh Covered Syllabub #7399 SOLD

A charming form, this Chinese export porcelain covered syllabub, or pot-de-creme, is finally hand-painted in the classic Brown Fitzhugh pattern with a central roundel bearing the initial H. From a service made for the American market and most likely ordered for prominent New Yorker John Hone (1764-1832) who was Mayor of New York during Lafayette’s visit in 1825 as well as President of the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company.  Measuring 3 1/4″ tall x 3 1/2″ wide, and in good condition, with a Henry Moog provenance and dating to circa 1825.