Rare PAIR of “The Doctor’s Visit” Plates #4158, 1 sold

A very finely painted pair of Chinese export porcelain plates decorated in famille rose enamels with “The Doctor’s Visit” design after original images commissioned by the Dutch East India Company from Dutch artist Cornelius Pronk. The unusual outer border comprised of fish within shaped and scaled lozenges which alternate with vignettes of water fowl. The fish theme continues within the central scene as two of the seated characters are actually each holding a fish. What this has to do with a “doctor’s visit” we cannot profess to say as this design has simply always been called that and the origins are now lost. What is remarkable though, besides the fine painting and wonderfully refined color palette, is that a Dutch artist was commissioned to create patterns for Chinese porcelain, featuring Chinese images, that were sold back to the Dutch market! An exemplary pair with only the most minor issues; one plate with a chip filled, the other with a hairline sealed, otherwise beautiful! Measuring 10″ in diameter. Circa 1745. Priced individually.

Elegant Celadon Hexagonal Garden Seat #7060

A very elegant Chinese export porcelain slip-decorated hexagonal form garden seat decorated with fine branches of flowering peony and prunus with birds and butterflies raised in white relief against a soothing celadon green ground. Measuring 19″ x 14″ and in very good condition. A handsome and useful addition to most any room. Late 19th/early 20th century.

 

Fine Jiaqing Period Mandarin Oval Platter #7218

One of a graduated set of three fine platters we have from this exquisitely produced Chinese export porcelain dinner service, hand-painted in famille rose  enamels with a central courtly Mandarin scene of figures on a terrace, encircled within an orange, sepia and gilt border of equally fine quality. Measuring 10″ x 13″ and in excellent condition. Jiaqing period, circa 1795.

Qianlong Figural Candleholders #5058

A fine and rare couple of Chinese export porcelain figural candleholders fashioned in the form or court ladies each holding a lotus blossom, richly decorated in vibrant famille rose enamels, their lavish flowing robes designed with auspicious bats amongst clouds and peony blossoms  against a prunus and cracked ice ground, both ladies with capes of exotic peacock feathers. Figures such as these fed the European mania for all things Chinese and exotic and would have been part of any rich and fashionable interior of the time. Measuring 12″ tall and with restoration to the hands and lotus blossoms of both, as well as some minor re-touch to the edges of one lady’s robes, otherwise in good condition. Mid-18th century.

 

Rare SET of Eight Kangxi Famille Verte Plates #5069

Pictured here are five of a fine and rare set of eight Chinese export porcelain Kangxi period famille verte plates. Each is finely potted and decorated with a large flowering branch of the auspicious peony, the “Queen of the Flowers” and a symbol of nobility and wealth, then encircled within a outer cavetto ruyi border, and the rim edged with a foliate band with further peony blossoms. Measuring 8 1/2″ in diameter. One with a small spider crack and associated line, and one or two with very slight stacking wear, otherwise the group remains in very fine condition indeed considering their age; Kangxi period, circa 1700-1720. Makes for a very impressive and brilliant display!

Philadelphia Plates #7341

A very elegant pair of Chinese export porcelain plates, made for the American market, in particular from a special order service made for the Chew family of Philadelphia, each centered with a gilded star monogrammed with a “C”. The Chew family were active and very prominent participants in the life of Philadelphia- practicing law, presiding over courts, involved with the American Revolution and the Continental Congress, and later becoming very wealthy China traders. They built the beautiful manor house of Cliveden in Germantown, PA which still stands today.  Their rich history with Pennsylvania is discussed in Philadelphians and the China Trade 1784-1844. The plates measure 8″ in diameter, are in very good condition and date to the very early 19th century.

$1150. each

Very Fine Mandarin Plates #4626

A pattern we always seek out is this beautiful service that always has wonderful Mandarin scenes well rendered in famille rose enamels within a very rich border of flowers and butterflies against a rich, gilded ground. This must have been a one-off special order service in its day and is an excellent example of the luxury of the private trade in the early years of the 19th century. Measuring 7 3/4″ in diameter, slight stacking wear to one, otherwise in very fine condition; circa 1810.

 

 

 

 

Fine Oval Jiaqing Period Platter #7219

From several pieces we have from this fine service, this exquisitely rendered Chinese export porcelain platter is decorated in famille rose enamels with a scene of courtly figures on a terrace within a meticulously painted orange, sepia and gilt border. Measuring 7 3/4″ x 10 1/2″ and in excellent condition. Circa 1795.

Exceptional Kangxi Famille Verte 13 13/4″ Dish Charger #4920

A truly exceptional Chinese export porcelain 13 3/4″ dish charger decorated in vibrant famille verte enamels with a central scene of two birds amongst flowering peony, the border with elaborately decorated alternating panels of floral and landscape vignettes and exotic creatures and mythical beasts. Note the calligraphic ease and facility with which these characters and decoration are rendered; truly a design you can get lost in! Very good condition with only minor rim roughness to the glaze. Kangxi period, circa 1700-1720.

Exquisite Kangxi “Ling-Lung” Tea Bowl and Saucer #7356 Sold

An especially fine example of the potter’s art, this Chinese export porcelain tea bowl and saucer is decorated in underglaze with both double wall and reticulated construction. This was, and remains today, a tour-de-force in porcelain production with hand-cut open work designs along the saucer’s edge as well as a honey-comb pattern cut into the outer wall of the tea bowl. If that were not enough, the inner wall of the tea bowl behind the reticulation is also hand-painted. This utterly remarkable piece typifies the quality of porcelain, glaze and sheer artistry of the Kangxi period artisans, and it is no wonder why it was referred to as “Ling-Lung” or “Devil’s Work” due to the amount of time, talent, and patience it took to create it. It is in surprisingly good condition with only one small ‘spoke’ missing from the roundel on one side of the tea bowl restored, otherwise, just a truly lovely object.  We have had several tea bowls over the years, but this is the first time we’ve ever had a tea bowl with a saucer.  Saucer 5 1/4″ in diameter, the tea bowl 3 1/4″ in diameter. Kangxi, circa 1690.