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8″ Mandarin Plate with Boating Scene #7423 SOLD

A vibrantly enameled Chinese export porcelain 8″ plate decorated with a central Mandarin boating scene within a very richly painted outer border of birds, butterflies, and flowers against a gilded ground. The scene appears idyllic enough, but the story goes that courtesans often operated these boats of pleasure as we see here with a lovely lady seductively playing a stringed instrument while a family’s boat is passing by and a young man’s attentions are aroused by the music as his father beckons him from within their boat to pay no heed.  Very good condition. Circa 1820. $675.00

Very Rare Pair of Famille Rose Wall Pockets SOLD

A rather rare pair of Chinese export porcelain Famille Rose wall pockets, modeled in the form of cornucopia with floral decoration and Mandarin figural borders, and mounted in a fine pair of English Regency gilded bronze sheep’s head mounts. Small restorations to the rim of the pockets, but otherwise good condition and bearing old collection stickers for Matthew and Elisabeth Sharpe. Late 18th/early 19th century.

Charming Frog Brush Washer #7514

A very charming and auspicious Chinese export porcelain diminutive brush washer in the form of a frog decorated in a turquoise glaze and set upon a later custom carved wood stand. Along with their obvious association with water, frogs (and toads) symbolize wealth and prosperity and an object such as this was part of the accoutrements that would have graced a scholar’s table, perhaps given as a gift and a wish for prosperity and success upon graduation from his official exams. Measuring 3″ long and in very good condition with only a minor glaze lost to one of his small feet. Early 18th century. $750.00

 

Mandarin Cachepot #7492c SOLD

A very attractive Chinese export porcelain footed cachepot, decorated in Famille Rose enamels with leisurely Mandarin figures and their attendants within a continuous landscape. The top edge of the pot bordered with a band of delicately rendered flowers. Measuring 3″ tall x 5″ in diameter.  In very good condition. Circa 1820.  $850.00

 

 

 

 

Reticulated “Folly Fort” Oval Dish #7508 SOLD

A very nice Chinese export porcelain reticulated oval serving dish hand-painted with a riverscape view of the “Folly Fort” at the entrance of the Pearl River leading up to the port at Canton. After months of at sea, this would have been one of the first landmarks China traders would have seen marking the end of their arduous journey and the beginning of their trading season at the factories of Canton.  A very interesting view of the early China Trade, sometimes also appearing in paintings of the period.  Measuring 7″ x 9 1/4″.  In very good condition with the exception of a little stacking and enamel wear.  Circa 1790-1800.

 

 

Mandarin Soup Plate #7494c SOLD

A fine Chinese export porcelain 10″ soup plate, decorated in Famille Rose enamels with a central Mandarin scene of a kneeling supplicant before an obviously important official on a rather grand garden terrace with marble steps overlooking a river in the background. The richness of detail continues in a full floral and butterfly border with gilded edging. The color and detail in these imaginative hand-painted pieces never ceases to catch the eye – note the well-rendered marble stair and the official’s detailed rank badge. Very good condition. Circa 1820.

 

 

Rare Grisaille Moses Tea Bowl and Saucer #7510

A very special Chinese export porcelain tea bowl and saucer made for the European market, thinly potted and bearing a finely rendered image of Moses Amongst the Bullrushes – almost certainly taken from a European engraving of the period. This grisaille-decorated ware, sometimes called ‘Jesuit ware’, often carried such images, both religious and secular, and we have often handled nativity and crucifixion scenes and portraits of Calvin and other religious leaders, but this is the first time we’ve seen a image of the baby Moses amongst the bulrushes.  In addition, we are pleased to have an example in such near pristine condition.  The saucer measuring 4″ in diameter, the tea bowl 3″.  Circa 1745. 

 

 

 

 

Pair of Rare Dutch Ship-Decorated Plates #7499 Sold

A really fine pair of Chinese export porcelain shaped dinner plates meticulously hand-painted in a raspberry enamel, each with a central scene of a ship flying what appears to be a Dutch flag ailing through choppy seas towards a city on the horizon, most likely Amsterdam, one of the premier China Trade ports of the world at this time. The very linear rendering, almost certainly taken from a engraving of the period, is encircled with a border of a snake swallowing its own tail. This ancient emblem originated in Egypt and is called an ouroboros and it denotes the repetitive cycle of creation arising out of destruction. How this image ended up on a piece of Chinese porcelain with a European maritime image is cause for further speculation. What is more keeping with the period of the plate is the charming scrolling and foliate and gilded spearhead borders. Both plates measuring 9″ in diameter and in great condition with only slight re-touch to minimal stacking wear. Fantastic maritime images of the China Trade. Mid-18th century.

 

 

Rare Ming Sancai Crayfish Form Ewer #7501 SOLD

A rather rare and highly unusual Ming period Chinese sancai-glazed biscuit ewer in the form of a crayfish poised upon a lotus leaf riding the crest a wave with koi jumping amongst the swirling waters on either side, and a further companion, a toad, forming the cover of the ewer, riding upon the crayfish’s back. The color, composition, and form of this piece all adds to its charm and whimsy.  Pieces such as these were made not only for the Chinese market, but also for the Southeast Asian trade, especially Indonesia, where they were used for wine vessels in ritual ceremonies, as well as a few making their way into early noble and royal European collections where they were admired as curiosities and given as diplomatic gifts. Measuring approximately 8″ tall x 5″ wide, this one appears in rather good condition with only some restoration to the cover, the tip of the spout, and one of the crayfish legs. Similar example in the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam                Circa 1573-1620.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mandarin Plate #7495c SOLD

A fine Chinese export porcelain 10″ dinner plate, richly decorated in Famille Rose enamels and centered with a great Mandarin scene of figures on a rather grand marble and latticework terrace all within a lush border full of flowers and butterflies, all with gilded detail. Great detail throughout, note in the foreground the rockwork garden and the brushwork on the willow tree. In very good condition. This would have certainly made up part of an extensive and rather eye-catching dinner service. Circa 1820.

 

 

 

 

Yongzheng Famille Rose Saucer Ex-RIZK Collection SOLD

A very finely potted Yongzheng period eggshell porcelain saucer, exquisitely decorated to a very high standard of craftsmanship, hand-painted in rich Famille Rose enamels that sit “proud of the surface” with a central peony roundel against a scrolling gilded foliate ground. A very small line at the rim on the reverse, otherwise very good condition, and bearing the collection sticker of K.R. Rizk whose collection was known for this degree of quality. Circa 1730.

 

 

Unusual Chinese Export Armorial Pickle Dish SOLD

A rather rare and unusual form for Chinese export armorial porcelain, this finely crafted diminutive pickle dish bears the Arms of MacDonald of Scotland. This little gem reflects the level of artistry put into these special order dinner services; no matter how many pieces (and these services were expansive) or what size the piece, each form was hand-painted with the same degree of meticulous quality. Illustrated in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. I, page 279. Circa 1795.

 

 

 

Pair of Richard Dale Pots-de-Creme #7491 SOLD

A great form, these charming Chinese export porcelain pots-de-creme are decorated in the neo-classical style in overglaze blue with gilded details each centered with a classical urn. They are from a service ordered by Captain Richard Dale (1756-1826) on his last trip to Canton in 1799. Dale served in the Revolution with the likes of John Barry and John Paul Jones.  Illustrated and discussed in Schiffer’s China for America, page 204. Glaze line to the bottom of one, otherwise, very good condition. Two other pieces from his service are listed in our collection; Item #7481.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pair of Mandarin Kidney-Shaped Dishes #7493c SOLD

A lovely pair of Chinese export porcelain kidney-shaped serving dishes vibrantly hand-painted in Famille Rose  enamels with central Mandarin scenes within a colorful border of well-rendered flowers and butterflies with a gilded edge.  Measuring 8″ x 11″ and in very good condition with only slight wear commensurate with age and felt pads adhered to the foot rims. This is always a pleasing form to add to one’s collection. Circa 1820.

 

 

 

Impressively Sized Sepia Fitzhugh Eagle Platter #7473 SOLD

A very rare Chinese export porcelain oval platter of impressive size and desirable decoration, finely hand-painted in the Sepia Fitzhugh pattern and centered with a large American eagle supporting a monogrammed shield and bearing in its beak a banner inscribed E PLURIBUS UNUM  taken from an early version of the Great Seal of the United States. Part, undoubtedly, of a special order dinner service whose original owner BSP, as inscribed on the shield, remains sadly unidentified. Measuring 12 1/2″ tall x 15 1/2″, we do not think we have ever had an example of Sepia Fitzhugh this large and with an eagle of this size. Despite some kiln ash from it’s original production, this piece is in remarkably great condition with no damage or repairs, the eagle decoration intact and only minor retouch to stacking wear in the cavetto.  A centerpiece for any Fitzhugh or American market collection.  Circa 1820.

 

 

Pair of Mandarin Hot Water Serving Dishes #7488 SOLD

A beautiful pair of Chinese export porcelain hot water serving dishes, richly hand-decorated with central Mandarin scenes within gilded cavettos, the rim bordered with swirling dragons alternating with small reserves of flaming pearls, a reserve at the top inscribed with the gilded monogram of the owner who originally ordered this spectacular service. Measuring 10″ across and in good condition with the exception of a very small rim chip to one, and some stacking wear to one cavetto. Circa 1795-1810.

 

 

 

 

 

Group of English Armorial Fitzhugh Porcelain #7481-7484

A very fine group of special order Chinese export porcelain hand-painted in the Blue Fitzhugh pattern and made for the English market, each piece bearing the ARMS of HILL DAWE quartering MOORE, LEWES AND SELWYNE. Discussed on page 645, vol. II in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain. Brilliant cobalt blue with contrasting gilding and polychrome central armorial. Very good condition, circa 1795.  10″, 8″ and 6″ plates along with a sauceboat and undertray. Priced individually.

 

 

 

 

 

 

RARE Chinese Wallpaper Panels of Tea and Porcelain Production #7486, #7487 Sold

A rather rare pair of Chinese export hand-painted wallpaper panels, rendered in gouache, one with a scene from tea production, the other representing one of the steps in porcelain production. These were most likely part of  more expansive continuous scenes depicting the processes of tea and porcelain production and were at some later point cut down and mounted as screen or decorative panels. The tea scene shows the packers being brought dried tea leaves as they stomp them into their packing crates; the porcelain scene represents one of the decorators workshops where the pieces were hand-painted before being fired, a laborer in the foreground bearing a yoke of firewood for the kiln. Both an extraordinary snapshot in time, beautifully rendered in warm colors and rich detail. Each measuring 58 1/2″ tall by 22 1/2″ wide and with the usual surface scuffs and abrasions and minor inpainting expected of pieces of this age, but in overall good and stable condition. Late 18th/early 19th century. Sold individually.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beautiful Chinese Painted Scenic Wallpaper Panels #7485 Sold

A pair of rare Chinese export hand-painted wallpaper panels, rendered in gouache on paper, later mounted as screen panels, depicting a father and son in their garden with their house in the background and with other family members seen in a gallery and through a window and with servants or vendors coming upon the scene, one yoked with baskets of vegetables. Are the squabbling cockerels in the garden mimicking the unruly child on the terrace gallery?  Lovely warm colors and rich in detail, these two panels were undoubtedly part of a more expansive scene at one time and would have captivated the western customers for which they were intended…and still do. Measuring 58 1/2″ tall x 22″ wide, the panels have the usual scuffs, minor inpainting and wear commensurate with age, but are in overall very good and stable condition. Late 18th/early 19th century.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pair of American market DeWitt Clinton Soup Plates #7471 SOLD

A very attractive pair of Chinese export porcelain soup plates made for the American market, decorated in Famille Rose enamels with an elegant Chinese landscape within a gilded spearhead border, the rim encircled with images of the Eight Immortals and centered at the top with a gilded monogram for DeWitt and Maria Clinton of New York.  In addition to this being one of the most decoratively beautiful services made for the American market, it was ordered for one of the most remarkable statesmen of the New Republic as DeWitt Clinton, as Governor of New York, was one of the driving forces in the building of the Erie Canal which made New York city into the financial powerhouse that it remains to this day.  He had also served in the New York State, was Mayor of New York, and at time ran for President. Both his father and uncle served in the Revolution.  Illustrated and discussed in New York and the China Trade, page 77.  Measuring 9″ across, in very good condition and dating to circa 1805.

 

 

 

Group of Blue Fitzhugh Armorial Porcelain #7482, 7483, 7484c

A fine group of Chinese export hand-painted Blue Fitzhugh porcelain with gilded details from a special order service, each piece including an armorial shield, made for Hill Dawe of Ditcheat House in Somerset, England. Discussed and illustrated in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. 1, page 690. All pieces are in very good condition with nicely rendered gilded detail, and date to circa 1800. 10″ dinner plates $400 each; 8″ plates $300 each; and the sauce boat and under tray $600. Net.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

American Market Ship Mug #7476 SOLD

A very fine example of a Chinese export porcelain mug made for the American market hand-painted with a three-masted ship flying two American flags, with a delicate floral and dotted border and double strap handle. Restoration to handle, otherwise in very good condition, measuring 4 1/2″ tall and dating to circa 1800. Excellent rendering of the ship.

 

 

 

American Market Eagle-Decorated 9 3/4″ Plate #7461 SOLD

A very handsome example of a Chinese export porcelain eagle-decorated dinner plate, made for the American market and undoubtedly part of a special-order dinner service whose patriotic owner remains to this point a mystery. Centered with a finely rendered sepia eagle supporting a blue and gold-striped shield, a banner reading E Pluribus Unum held in the bird’s beak floats above his head encircled in clouds and against a star-filled sky all within an elaborate gilded classical-style border. A dinner service made for John C. Calhoun bears a similar eagle design. Some wear to the gilding, otherwise very good condition. Measuring 9 3/4″ in diameter and dating to circa 1825.

 

 

Rare American Market Ship-Decorated Bowl #7440

An unusual version of a ship-decorated bowl made for the early American market, this 10″ punch bowl is hand-painted with a large blue star-studded “Jack” flag which denoted that there was either an ambassador aboard or that the ship was on a diplomatic mission of some sort.  This flag remained in use aboard United States naval ships until the early 20th century. The bowl measuring 10″ in diameter and restored. Circa 1800.

 

 

 

 

Singular American Market Ship Mug #7477 Sold

A charming and possibly unique design, this wonderful 4″ tall mug with rope twist handle is finely painted with the image of a dove perched upon a classical plinth beneath a banner inscribed AMERICA with the partial image of a ship in the distance flying a nicely detailed American flag from its stern. The plinth monogrammed with the yet unknown owner’s initials, though most likely the ship’s captain or supercargo. Very good condition. Circa 1795-1810.

 

 

Charming! Pair of Kangxi Shoe-Shaped Brush Washers #7476 SOLD

A very charming pair of diminutive Chinese porcelain brush washers modeled in the form of Chinese shoes cast with relief detailing of black against a green enamel ground. In Chinese culture, shoes symbolize wealth as their shape resembles silver ingots. And, in combination with a mirror, they mean “together and in harmony”.  This harmonious little pair measuring 3 1/2″ long is in very good condition with only a slight hairline to the interior of one shoe. Kangxi period, circa  1700.

 

 

 

 

 

Superb American Eagle Decorated Plate #7461 SOLD

A beautiful example of special-order China Trade porcelain for the American Market, this richly gilded-border 9 3/4″ plate is centered with a sepia rendered spread eagle supporting a blue and gilded stripe shield, clutching a banner in its beak inscribed E Pluribus Unum beneath a halo of clouds and stars. The eagle taken from an early version of the Great Seal of the United States. In very good condition with only a minute 1/4″ hairline sealed to the reverse rim. Early 19th century.

 

 

Mandarin Kidney-Shaped Dish #7467c

A great form, this lovely Chinese export porcelain kidney-shaped dish is wonderfully decorated in vibrant Famille Rose enamels centered with a scene of courtly gentlemen seated on a garden terrace with their attendants, all within a border of exotic bird vignettes alternating with raspberry enameled diapering, bamboo branches, and gilded scrolls. Measuring 8 1/4″ x 11 1/4″ and in very good condition. Circa 1810-1820.

 

 

 

American Ship Decorated Tea Bowl and Saucer SOLD

A great example of Chinese export porcelain made for the new American republic-this breakfast tea bowl and saucer are finely hand-painted with images of a ship under sail flying two American flags. From the Root service, and once in the collection of Elinor Gordon and exhibited at the Baltimore Museum, it is considered one of the best ship renderings on export ware of this period. Restoration to the saucer and piece out of the tea bowl and re-attached. The saucer measuring 6″ in diameter, the tea bowl 4″. Circa 1800.

 

 

 

Diminutive American Market Eagle-Decorated Mug #7469c SOLD

A charming and rare-sized Chinese export porcelain mug, made for the American market, hand-painted with a sepia spread eagle supporting a blue and gold shield beneath a faint halo of gilded stars, along with a twisted rope handle and blue dot borders. These mugs most often came in graduated sets so this most likely was the smallest in the group-perfect for a very patriotic child! Measuring 3 1/2″ tall and with a line running along side the handle and onto the bottom of the mug-all professionally sealed-the eagle design in original condition. Circa 1800-1810.

 

 

Yongzheng Teapot with Koi Decoration #7458

A charming Chinese export porcelain teapot of molded form-the cover and lower portion of the pot shaped to resemble lotus petals and the lotus motif continues on the bottom of the piece as an applied lotus bud and stem which forms the feet upon which the piece rest. The hand-painted images of koi are a symbol of conjugal harmony as they are believed to mate for life. This is an excellent example of the fantastical sort of  Chinese teawares that enthralled European consumers in the 18th century. In remarkably good condition. Measuring 4 1/2″ tall x 6″ wide. Circa 1735.

 

 

 

British Ship Mug #7463C Sold

A fine 4 3/4″ tall Chinese export porcelain mug centered with an image of  a British ship, its sails furled, its cannons ready and flying two English Union Jacks. A good example of late 18th/early 19th century maritime history. Very good condition. Circa 1800.

Rockefeller Pattern Handled Cups #7464 Sold

Three beautifully decorated Chinese export porcelain handled cups, most likely for hot chocolate or coffee, in the rare ROCKEFELLER pattern each one decorated with a central Mandarin scene against a meticulously hand-painted scrolling foliate ground that resembles fine brocade, a detailed sepia landscape cartouche is centered by the handle on the reverse. One cup with a line to the interior, otherwise very good condition. These pieces are from some of the finest special order dinner services commissioned during this period, circa 1795. Nelson Rockefeller owned a complete service.

 

 

 

 

Finely Rendered Nativity Scene Plate #7462 Sold

A beautifully decorated Chinese export porcelain 9″ dinner plate hand-painted en grisaille with gilded details with a central image of the Nativity within an elaborate scrolling and foliate rococo border. Almost certainly taken from a European print source, the painter meticulously rendering the scene in the line work and crosshatching he was copying from an engraved print. Very good condition with only a slight line to the rim of the reverse. Circa 1745.

 

 

 

Large Famille Rose Hexagonal Form Punch Pot #7460c Sold

A rare, large-sized Chinese export porcelain footed punch or wine pot, of hexagonal form, decorated in Famille Rose enamels with vignettes of phoenix and peony, hawks perched upon prunus branches amongst chrysanthemum, and figural scenes of women and children as well as a band of shaped panels with stylized dragons in relief around the neck of the pot. The conforming cover with further floral motifs and figures a playful boys, surmounted by a lotus bud knop.  The form similar to European hexagonal silver pots of the early 18th century. In remarkably good condition, measuring 7″ tall x 9″ wide and dating to circa 1740-1750. One image showing the pot for size in comparison to another more typical of the period.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Impressive 14″ 18th Century Mandarin Punch Bowl #7456 SOLD

A very fine Chinese export porcelain punch bowl of impressive size, measuring 14″ in diameter, and richly decorated in vibrant enamels-the entire exterior covered with detailed Mandarin scenes within scrolling rococo style cartouches alternating with vignettes of abundant flowering baskets, all against a meticulously hand-painted diapered ground with gilded details throughout.  The basket of flowers motif continues, centered within a roundel at the bottom of the bowl, the rim with floral rose swags in the European style. In very good condition, with only a minute rim chip and associated line professionally sealed. A very fine example. Circa 1770.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yongzheng Kylin-Decorated Tea Bowl and Saucer #7457 SOLD

Another fine piece of Yongzheng porcelain from our collection, this lovely Chinese export porcelain tea bowl and saucer are decorated in Famille Rose enamels, the pieces divided into quadrants, two are hand-painted with prancing kylin against richly enameled grounds with scrolling peony.  These alternate with vignettes of birds perched on prunus branches, all centered with a chrysanthemum roundel. Both pieces finely potted, the quality of porcelain and painting one expects from this brief period. Very good condition. Circa 1730.

Late Yongzheng/Early Qianlong Grisaille Tea Bowl and Saucer #7453 Sold

A very well-painted Chinese export porcelain tea bowl and saucer, thinly potted and decorated en grisaille with figures in a Chinese landscape.  We usually think of this grisaille method of decoration used for European special orders such as designs taken from engravings with Western subject matter, so we were delighted to have found a piece done in the Chinese taste.  Very good condition. Late Yongzheng early Qianlong period. Circa 1740.

 

 

 

 

 

Two Pairs of Fine Mandarin Plates #7455 A,B Sold

Two pairs of very well-painted Chinese export porcelain 8″ plates rendered in Famille Rose enamels, all depicting colorful and detailed Mandarin scenes within elaborate raspberry-enameled diapered borders with exotic bird vignettes and gilded highlights. Pair ‘A’ features a lady of some importance being pushed about a garden in a wheel chair with a parasol while being greeting by officials, along with a second plate depicts a lady with her attendant being approached  in a landscape by a messenger or supplicant of some sort. Pair ‘B’ offers a plate with a pair of scholars seated at a marble table on an outdoor terrace about to be served their tea, along with another plate painted with a noble lady seated on a root chair with her attendants in an elaborate hall, listening to a musician perform upon the guzheng. Note the detail of the marble screen behind her, the elaborate floor tiles and even the miniature tray garden near the musician-a remarkable snapshot of life! Measuring 8″ in diameter and in very good condition with only the exception of slight stacking wear commensurate with age. Circa 1820.

PAIR A

 

 

PAIR B

 

 

 

Superb Transitional/Kangxi Period Brushpot #7446 Sold

A truly beautiful form, and superbly decorated in underglaze blue, this Chinese porcelain brush pot of simple flared cylindrical form is hand-painted with figures in a landscape being viewed from an attendant in a window and a scholar’s studio with his desk visible through an open door.  Excellent condition. Chenghua mark on the bottom as well as an old Chait collection sticker. Circa 1640-1660.

 

 

Rare Equestrian Hunting Punch Bowl #7425 SOLD

A rather rare Chinese export porcelain punch bowl decorated with equestrian hunting motifs, finely painted with two sepia roundels depicting huntsmen with their horses and hounds, alternating with two roundels depicting country house landscapes. The images and bowl rim edged with overglaze blue and gilded borders, the bottom interior with a basket of flowers design. It is suggested that these bowls were made for export to not only England but also for the American mid-Atlantic and southern colonies where the English aristocratic lifestyle with pursuits, such a fox hunting, was emulated. This is a fine example measuring 13 1/2″ in diameter with three lines restored, otherwise in very good condition, especially the finely rendered scenes-most likely taken from engravings of the period.  A similar example in the collections at Winterthur. Circa 1785.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pair of Extremely Rare Thomas Jefferson Pots-de-Creme #7437 Sold

A truly extraordinary example of Chinese export porcelain made for the American market, this beautiful pair of  covered pots-de-cremes is from a service made for our third, and one of our greatest, American presidents, Thomas Jefferson. The pattern-a simple underglaze blue spearhead border with gilded highlights, typical of the aesthetic of the Federal period-is augmented with an armorial crest surmounted by knight’s helmet flanked by flourishes and bellflower swags above a shield centered with a gilded initial J.  With a long history of descent in the Jefferson family, this service was auctioned off after Jefferson’s death in 1826 by his granddaughter Ellen Wayles Randolph, part of a massive sale of personal property made necessary by the staggering debt in which Jefferson left his estate. The service was later reacquired by Ellen Randolph’s grandson for the family and pieces were eventually lent out to various public collections for exhibition; four pieces were donated to the White House in 1906 and are still in their possession. It has been suggested that Governor and Mrs. Christopher Gore of Massachusetts, while on a diplomatic mission to London, ordered the service for President Jefferson as they ordered an identical one for themselves with the initial G. With many thanks to Becky McGuire, Christies, New York for her research. This specific pair of pots-de-creme has a history of descent in the family of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge of Boston. Both pieces in fine condition, measuring 3″ tall. Circa 1800-1810.

Kangxi Period Famille Verte Lotus Dish #7447 Sold

A very beautiful Chinese export porcelain 9″ lotus-form dish decorated in Famille Verte enamels with a central scene of flowering peony amongst rockwork, the theme continued on a smaller scale filling each lotus petal panel around the rim of the dish.  We have had these dishes with the design painted in underglaze blue many times over the past years but this is the first example we’ve enjoyed in this striking color palette. Measuring 9″ across, and with two pieces out of the rim of restored perfectly, otherwise fine condition. Circa 1700-1710.

 

 

Impressive Scottish “Arms of Grant” Platter and Mazzarene #7444 Sold

A beautiful Chinese export porcelain armorial platter and mazzarene, measuring 13″ x 16″, finely hand-painted in vibrant Famille Rose enamels with courtly Mandarin scenes, both scenes centered at the top with the Grant coat-of arms, and both with an outer border with elaborately rendered flowers and butterflies. Made to delight and impress with its richness, from a service most likely made for Sir William Grant who married in 1811. Illustrated and discussed in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, vol. I, page 1002. In very good condition, circa 1815-1820.

 

 

 

 

 

American Market 10 1/4″ Ship Punch Bowl #7440 Sold

With a rather rare American ship decoration, this fine  Chinese export porcelain punch bowl is centered front and back with a hand-painted image of a three-masted  frigate or sloop flying what is referred to as a Jack Flag with a navy blue ground with gold stars. This flag was flown on our ships from 1777 until 1916 and designated the presence of an ambassador or minister of the diplomatic corps on board. This bowl has a mate in the Reeves Collection and is illustrated and discussed on page 212 of Thomas Litzenburg, Jr.’s book Chinese Export Porcelain in the Reeves Collection at Washington and Lee University. Measuring 10 1/4″ in diameter and dating to circa 1795. Two lines and restoration.

 

 

 

 

Elegant Yongzheng Famille Rose Plate #7451 SOLD

A fine Chinese export porcelain Yongzheng period plate, hand-painted with Famille Rose enamels with a scene of a pair of pheasants perched amongst rockwork and flowering peony within a finely rendered gilded foliate cavetto, the rim with flowering branches and butterflies. The pheasant was the symbol of refinement and would have been a perfect choice of subject for such a refined piece as this with it’s muted tones and perfectly balanced white space-all so typical of the Yongzheng period. The plate measuring 9″ in diameter and, other than a Y-shaped line to the glaze on the reverse, it is in good condition. Circa 1730-35.

 

 

 

CA MAU Shipwreck Tea Bowls and Saucers #7437 SOLD

 

A real treasure, truly, this beautifully intact pair of Chinese export porcelain tea bowls and saucers are part of the famous Ca Mau shipwreck cargo that was discovered in 1998 off the coast of south Vietnam. It was  the remains of an early 18th century Chinese junk carrying approximately 130,000 pieces of porcelain on it’s way from Canton to the Dutch port of Batavia (now Jakarta) when it sunk in about 1725. After the cargo was retrieved and catalogued, three Vietnamese museums chose what they wanted for their collections, the remaining 76,000 pieces were sold in a spectacular sale at Sotheby’s in Amsterdam in 2007 that garnered worldwide attention.  Pieces from this shipwreck, needless to say, are sometimes damaged or somewhat degraded having been under salt water for nearly three centuries, but these two examples remain in extraordinarily good condition, finely potted, charmingly hand-painted in underglaze blue, and with much of their original glaze more intact than what one usually sees on these shipwreck pieces. The saucers 4 1/2″ in diameter, the tea bowls 2 3/4″ in diameter. All pieces bearing the Sotheby’s sale stickers; an opportunity to own a piece of a time capsule of the China Trade.  Circa 1725.

 

 

 

 

American Ship Tea Caddy and Cover #7418A Sold

A nice example of Chinese export porcelain made for the American market, this dome-shouldered tea caddy is hand-painted on both sides with an image of a three-masted ship under sail, proudly flying two American flags. Small restoration to cover and neck, otherwise good condition. Measuring 4 1/4″ tall x 3″ wide. Circa 1800.

Rare American Market “Cow Pox” 5 1/2″ Bowl #7434 SOLD

A charming Chinese export porcelain 5 1/2″ bowl made for the American market, from a tea service ordered by Dr. Benjamin Waterhouse of Cambridge, MA. (1754-1846). Inscribed with the gilded initial W within a chain-link bordered roundel featuring the images of two cows in a pasture. The bucolic imagery was not only decorative but also an advertisement for innoculation by cowpox as a preventative vaccine against smallpox. Though the innoculation had been known since early in the 18th century, it was still a very controversial procedure (as it remains today). Dr. Waterhouse innoculated his own children with this method and commemorated the event with a special order tea set. Discussed and illustrated in Schiffer’s China for America, page 174. This bowl most likely the slop bowl from the tea set, with three lines restored, but charming imagery beautifully intact. Circa 1800.