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Fine Yongzheng Period Armorial Plate #6066

An especially beautiful, early Yongzheng period armorial plate, made for the Anglo-Indian market as it bears the ARMS OF  STACKHOUSE, almost certainly made for John Stackhouse, Governor and President of Bengal (1732-1739) and who is buried in St. John’s Church, Calcutta.  The plate is centered with a flamboyant central arms rendered in the newly developed famille rose enamels, encircled within a lavishly detailed, gilded foliate cavetto border and with an outer rim of gilded peonies, all finished with a further gilded scrolling foliate edge. Outstanding painting and quality, in good condition with only small reverse chips filled and a short hairline consolidated. To make the piece even more interesting, it is said that the service was later used as payment of a gambling debt between the Prince Regent and the royal saddler David Pollock. Illustrated and discussed in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. I, page 223.

 

Rare 14″ Armorial Punch Bowl #6045

 

We are delighted to offer this rather rare, recently discovered Chinese export porcelain armorial punch bowl. The exterior a finely painted with Mandarin scenes, while the bottom of the interior is centered with a large and lavish armorial for the arms of Home quartering Pepdie with Landell in pretence beneath an earl’s coronet and with the lion supporters of the Earl of Home. Most likely made for William, the 8th Earl of Home who died in 1761.

This armorial is related to a grisaille service illustrated in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. I, page 350, but to our knowledge there are no known examples of this full scale arms with the coronet and lions on the market. We are very grateful to Angela Howard of Heirloom and Howard who helped us identify this armorial and bring it to light.

The condition is good, with only three rim lines consolidated, some wear to the interior spearhead border, and the enamels slightly refreshed on the fantastic coat-of-arms. Beautiful large-scale Mandarin scenes with landscapes surrounding the exterior in vibrant famille rose enamels. 14″ in diameter. Circa 1750-1760.

 

 

Fine Pair of CHAPMAN Armorials

A fantastic example of Chinese export special order armorial porcelain made for the English market, these fine plates are from a service bearing the Arms of Chapman quarterly impaling Wood quarterly with Edmundson in pretence. These elaborate and flamboyantly rendered arms with their Latin motto fill the well of the plate within a gilded spearhead cavetto border, the rim decorated with an understated rendering of elegant flowering peony branches in bianco-sopra-bianco. Services such as these were de rigueur status symbols for the English nobility of the 18th century, advertising their wealth and connections. Discussed and illustrated in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, vol. I, page 411. Measuring 9″ in diameter, and in very good condition. Circa 1740.

 

Rare Ker-Martin Bowl with the Symbol of Hope #6029 Sold

A wonderful example of a the very well-known Ker-Martin service, made for the English market to commemorate the marriage of William Ker to his first cousin Jane Martin around 1790. What has always made this service so interesting and attractive is its design and iconography centered with a large image of Hope with her anchor leaning upon a large shield which bears the families’ arms. The fantastic border design contains four cartouches representing the four quarters of the globe-Europe, Asia, America and Africa, an allusion perhaps to Britain’s extensive colonial and mercantile empire at the time. The 9″ diameter bowl is of molded and scalloped form, the rim with a line, and a piece out and restored, but otherwise good condition, especially the great decoration for which this service is so sought-after. Discussed in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. I, page 694.  Ex-Elinor Gordon collection. Circa 1790-1800.

Yongzheng Dutch Armorial Plate #6017

An exquisite example of Chinese export porcelain made for the Dutch market, this very fine armorial plate is from a service created for a marriage between the  De Neufville and De Wolff families. It is centered with an elaborately painted double arms within a jewel-like diapered cavetto, the outer rim decorated with various Chinese ‘precious objects’ and floral motifs and centered at the top with a family crest. The two families were very wealthy Mennonite silk merchants.  Measuring 9″ in diameter, and with two very minor flakes and and a glaze line to the reverse, otherwise in very fine condition. Illustrated and discussed in Kroes’ Chinese Armorial Porcelain for the Dutch Market, page 126. Circa 1725-1730.

 

Fine Late Yongzheng Dutch Armorial #5072

A very handsome late Yongzheng/early Qianlong period Chinese export porcelain Dutch armorial dinner plate centered with the Arms of De Jonge, finely enameled and gilded, within a cavetto border and rim decoration of meticulously painted underglaze blue floral designs. Peony blossoms and butterflies are scattered about the rim on the reverse. The arms were borne by Cornelis de Jonge (1687-1743), a VOC official in Bengal, and also by his son Dr. Christian de Jonge (1730-1790). Measuring 9″ in diameter, and in good condition with the exception of a small rim line sealed. Circa 1735-1740. Illustrated in Kroes’ Chinese Armorial Porcelain for the Dutch Market, page 198.

Fine Hanbury Armorial Plate #4954

A very finely preserved Chinese export porcelain plate made for the English market, bearing the Arms of Hanbury in pretence with Comyn. John Hanbury, a Quaker, was known in London as the “Virginia Merchant” as he held vast tracts of lands in Maryland and Virginia, unfortunately, he also held the slaves that maintained these lands and sustained his fortune, earning him the animosity of his fellow Quakers. A very rich and impressive service for a “plain” Quaker, the large and dramatic arms centered on a plate edged with a finely detailed gilded grapevine border. Illustrated in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, vol. I, page 235 . Excellent condition, measuring 9″ in diameter. Circa 1735.

Fine Blue Fitzhugh Armorials #4943c

A very fine group of four Chinese export porcelain Blue Fitzhugh armorial plates bearing the Arms of Dawe. Beautifully decorated in a striking underglaze blue highlighted with gilding, the finely detailed four quadrants of peony and ‘precious objects’ surrounding the central arms. Measuring 10″ in diameter, very good condition and dating to circa 1800. Discussed in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. I, page 690. Net 1050.00 each.

Fine English Market Hanbury Armorial

An especially fine Chinese export porcelain  9″ armorial plate, made for the English market, centered with the very grand Arms of Hanbury in pretence with Comyn, this plate was part of a service ordered by prominent London Quaker merchant John Hanbury (1700-1758). According to Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. I, page 265, “This famous ‘Virginia Merchant’ was granted very considerable lands in Maryland and Virginia, and aroused animosity among his Quaker friends for permitting slavery on his estates”. Please note the exquisitely wrought gilded grapevine borders, virtually untouched from the day the service was unpacked on the East India docks! Yongzheng period, circa 1735.

 

 

 

 

 

 

#4780 Wonderful Van Tets Dutch Armorial Soup Plate

One of the better known armorial services for the Dutch market, this truly inventive and elaborate design combines the arms of Arnoldus Adrianus van Tets (1738-1792) and Wilhemina Jacoba Hartingh (1750-1813) and was ordered to celebrate their marriage in Batavia in 1767. Arnoldus spent thirteen years in the service of the East India Company returning home to the Netherlands. in 1770. Fully discussed and illustrated in Kroes’ Chinese Armorial Porcelain for the Dutch Market, page 347-348. Our example also bears a collection sticker of Elinor Gordon who once owned a large part of this service. Measuring 9 1/2″ in diameter, and in very good condition. Circa 1767.