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Extremely Rare Spanish Colonial Armorial #7026

A rather rare Chinese export armorial made for the Spanish Colonial market and of highly unusual form, this trefoil form serving dish is centered with the Arms of Domingo Ignacio de Lardizabal y Arza (1731-1812). He resided in Cadiz, Spain where is was registered as a merchant. He then emigrated to New Spain where he served as Captain of the Militias in Mexico City and was made Knight of the Order of Santiago in 1766. This service most likely made after that date as it incorporates the cross of the Order behind the armorial. Measuring 10″ x 12″, in very good condition, and dating to circa 1785. Ex-Elinor Gordon Collection.

Extremely Rare Canadian Armorial Plate #7025

A very rare Chinese export porcelain plate made for the Canadian market, centered with the arms of a Canadian trading company. The armorial design features a central shield with images of the four sources of wealth of the Canadian trade: whale, fish, beaver and mink, with human supporters in the form of Britannia  with a ship’s mast, a cornucopia at her feet, and the “noble savage” of the wilderness with his bow, arrows, beaver, and a black bear, the crest rendered as a globe surmounted by a trading ship. All within diapered and spearhead borders in underglaze blue. Measuring 9 3/4″ in diameter and in very good condition. Discussed and illustrated in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, vol. I, Page 715. Circa 1795.

 

Sauce Tureen with Boston/Fanueil Provenance #6085

A fine Chinese export porcelain covered sauce tureen and stand decorated in underglaze blue with a rather rare landscape view, and with each piece also bearing a small armorial crest of a lion rampant. The crest derives from an English family into which Mary Fanueil Bethunes married and the service descended in the Fanueil family. She was a descendant of the famous Fanueil family of Boston, prominent merchants of Huguenot descent and creators of the well-known Fanueil Hall which still stands as a centerpiece of Boston’s downtown. The unusual decoration is discussed in Ayers’ China for the West, Vol. II, page 546 where the rather singular rendering of the large thatched structure is conjectured to be an actual building taken from a drawing, perhaps someplace along the Pearl River in the environs of Canton. Measuring approximately 8″ long, the piece is in very good condition. It includes a second sauce tureen and stand, which is damaged, but presents well to form as pair. Circa 1790.   #3800.00

English Armorial Soup Plate with Shipping Imagery #6075

A beautiful Chinese export porcelain 9″ soup plate made for the English market, bearing the Arms of MILLS impaling WEBBER, centered with a quatrefoil reserve decorated with a scene of a European gentleman walking along the banks of a river, a walled and towered town on the opposite side, while the rim is decorated with two reserves featuring Western ships entering harbors, the rim top featuring the family’s crest of a lion rampant, the bottom centered with the arms. The use of the porcelain white space sets off the famille rose designs beautifully. Illustrated in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. I, page 325. This piece with a history of descent in the family of  Robert Treat Paine of Boston. Glaze line and very minor rim frit, otherwise quite fine condition. Another available to make a pair. Circa 1745.

 

Rare 14″ Armorial Punch Bowl #6045

 

We are delighted to offer this rather rare, recently discovered Chinese export porcelain armorial punch bowl. The exterior a finely painted with Mandarin scenes, while the bottom of the interior is centered with a large and lavish armorial for the arms of Home quartering Pepdie with Landell in pretence beneath an earl’s coronet and with the lion supporters of the Earl of Home. Most likely made for William, the 8th Earl of Home who died in 1761.

This armorial is related to a grisaille service illustrated in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. I, page 350, but to our knowledge there are no known examples of this full scale arms with the coronet and lions on the market. We are very grateful to Angela Howard of Heirloom and Howard who helped us identify this armorial and bring it to light.

The condition is good, with only three rim lines consolidated, some wear to the interior spearhead border, and the enamels slightly refreshed on the fantastic coat-of-arms. Beautiful large-scale Mandarin scenes with landscapes surrounding the exterior in vibrant famille rose enamels. 14″ in diameter. Circa 1750-1760.

 

 

Fine Pair of CHAPMAN Armorials

A fantastic example of Chinese export special order armorial porcelain made for the English market, these fine plates are from a service bearing the Arms of Chapman quarterly impaling Wood quarterly with Edmundson in pretence. These elaborate and flamboyantly rendered arms with their Latin motto fill the well of the plate within a gilded spearhead cavetto border, the rim decorated with an understated rendering of elegant flowering peony branches in bianco-sopra-bianco. Services such as these were de rigueur status symbols for the English nobility of the 18th century, advertising their wealth and connections. Discussed and illustrated in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, vol. I, page 411. Measuring 9″ in diameter, and in very good condition. Circa 1740.

 

Rare Ker-Martin Bowl with the Symbol of Hope #6029 Sold

A wonderful example of a the very well-known Ker-Martin service, made for the English market to commemorate the marriage of William Ker to his first cousin Jane Martin around 1790. What has always made this service so interesting and attractive is its design and iconography centered with a large image of Hope with her anchor leaning upon a large shield which bears the families’ arms. The fantastic border design contains four cartouches representing the four quarters of the globe-Europe, Asia, America and Africa, an allusion perhaps to Britain’s extensive colonial and mercantile empire at the time. The 9″ diameter bowl is of molded and scalloped form, the rim with a line, and a piece out and restored, but otherwise good condition, especially the great decoration for which this service is so sought-after. Discussed in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. I, page 694.  Ex-Elinor Gordon collection. Circa 1790-1800.

Fine Late Yongzheng Dutch Armorial #5072

A very handsome late Yongzheng/early Qianlong period Chinese export porcelain Dutch armorial dinner plate centered with the Arms of De Jonge, finely enameled and gilded, within a cavetto border and rim decoration of meticulously painted underglaze blue floral designs. Peony blossoms and butterflies are scattered about the rim on the reverse. The arms were borne by Cornelis de Jonge (1687-1743), a VOC official in Bengal, and also by his son Dr. Christian de Jonge (1730-1790). Measuring 9″ in diameter, and in good condition with the exception of a small rim line sealed. Circa 1735-1740. Illustrated in Kroes’ Chinese Armorial Porcelain for the Dutch Market, page 198.

Fine Hanbury Armorial Plate #4954

A very finely preserved Chinese export porcelain plate made for the English market, bearing the Arms of Hanbury in pretence with Comyn. John Hanbury, a Quaker, was known in London as the “Virginia Merchant” as he held vast tracts of lands in Maryland and Virginia, unfortunately, he also held the slaves that maintained these lands and sustained his fortune, earning him the animosity of his fellow Quakers. A very rich and impressive service for a “plain” Quaker, the large and dramatic arms centered on a plate edged with a finely detailed gilded grapevine border. Illustrated in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, vol. I, page 235 . Excellent condition, measuring 9″ in diameter. Circa 1735.

Fine Blue Fitzhugh Armorials #4943c

A very fine group of four Chinese export porcelain Blue Fitzhugh armorial plates bearing the Arms of Dawe. Beautifully decorated in a striking underglaze blue highlighted with gilding, the finely detailed four quadrants of peony and ‘precious objects’ surrounding the central arms. Measuring 10″ in diameter, very good condition and dating to circa 1800. Discussed in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. I, page 690. Net 1050.00 each.