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ORANGE FITZHUGH SETON ARMORIAL PLATE & POT DE CREME #7735, 7734 BOTH SOLD

One of the most striking armorial services made in the classic Fitzhugh pattern this beautifully hand-painted 9 3/4″ dinner plate and it’s accompanying 3 1/4″ pot-de-creme are both from a custom ordered service, each centered with the Arms of Seton quartering Hay, one of four services made for this family, this one made for Sir Alexander Seton, fifth baronet, who, along with his three sons, were all involved in the service of the Honourable East India Company. Illustrated and discussed in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, vol. II, page 541. Very good condition. Circa 1810.  The plate $1,800.00, the pot-de-creme $1,250.00

 

Extremely Fine Hanbery Armorial Soup Plate #7723 SOLD

The best example of this early Yongzheng period service we’ve ever handled, this lovely Chinese export porcelain soup plate, ordered for the English market, bears the bold central Arms of Hanbery with Comyin in Pretence all with an extremely rich and detailed gilded grapevine border. Little expense was spared to create this fine service which is at odds with whom it was made for,  one John Hanbury a wealthy Quaker London tobacconist who held considerable lands in Maryland and Virginia which were worked by enslaved laborers drawing much ire and scorn from his Quaker friends and associates.  Mr. Hanbury is further discussed and an example of this service illustrated in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. I, page 265.  Minor rim chips and a line to the reverse, but the front in virtually pristine condition, the gilding especially fine.  9″ in diameter.  Circa 1730-1735.  Ex- Elinor Gordon collection.

 

Superlative Yongzheng Armorial Plate #7698c Sold

An especially fine Chinese export porcelain Yongzheng period armorial plate made for the English market, decorated with a central coat-of arms within an iron red scrolling foliate border, the rim meticulously hand-painted with a soft grisaille floral ground with four reserves of gilded peonies and butterflies, all truly elegant. Bearing the Arms of Braithwaite impaling Tayleur.  Fully illustrated and discussed in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. II, page 193.  The Yorkshire family has quite an interesting history with colonial connections to both South Africa and the Coromandel Coast.  This plate is the one actually illustrated in Howard’s book, ex-Nelson Kline Collection.  Measuring 9″ in diameter and in good condition. Circa 1733.

 

Spectacular Armorial Yongzheng Saucer # 7701c Sold

An amazingly detailed armorial decoration on this fine Chinese export porcelain saucer from this Yongzheng period.  Finely potted and enameled in the Famille Rose palette, the top half of the saucer is centered with a lavish, baroque Arms of Goodwin of Devon and Suffolk and the lower half very well painted with a typical Chinese design of cockerels amongst peony blossoms all within and rockwork, surrounded by cellwork and diapered cavetto and border.  What a mind-boggling amount of talent and time was lavished on this one fine saucer, the tea set must have been beautiful and impressive, as was its intention at the time.  Measuring 4 1/2″ in  diameter and with only a small rim flake  to the reverse edge filled, otherwise very food condition. Illustrated and discussed in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. I, page 231 and from the Nelson Kline Collection.  Circa 1730.

 

Yongzheng Dutch Armorial Plate #7672c

A truly elegant Chinese export porcelain Yongzheng period plate made for the Dutch market, richly hand-painted in Famille Rose enamels, centered with a large central gilded shield bearing a fleur-de-lys and surmounted by knight’s helmet crest within flamboyant foliate surround, the cavetto diapered in pink with reserves of flowering branches, the floral motif continued around the rim with rich peony decoration and centered at the top with a crown and stag’s horn crest.  Bearing the Arms of Swellengrebel, almost certainly from a service made for Sergius Swellengrebel  (1694-1760) a Governor for the Dutch East India Company in the Cape Colony of South Africa. The history of the governing of the Dutch VOC colonies and outposts is discussed in detail in Kroes’ Chinese Armorial Porcelain for the Dutch Market, and this service in particular is illustrated and described on page 178 where the author points out design influences from similar English bespoke services of the period. Measuring 9″ in diameter with only a very small rim chip of two pieces out and restored, otherwise a beautiful plate in good condition.  Circa 1730-1735.

 

Early Qianlong Armorial Tea Caddy #7669c $1275.

A fine little Chinese export porcelain tea caddy of shaped form, decorated in Famille Rose enamels and gilding, from a bespoke service made for the English market and bearing the Arms of Amyatt, a family living near Southhampton.  Illustrated and discussed in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, vol I, page 556. Measuring 5″ tall and in good condition with only minor restoration around the shoulder and neck of the piece. Circa 1750. A great form.

Yongzheng Period Dutch Armorial #7649

An especially fine example of Chinese export porcelain made for the Dutch market, this Yongzheng period plate exemplifies the quality produced during this short period. From it’s finely detailed overglaze enamel and gilded coat-of-arms to the meticulously painted underglaze blue cavetto and border floral designs, this plate would have been part of an extensive service with each piece decorated with the same exacting quality. The family arms are those of De Jonge and the service was ordered by one Cornelis de Jonge (1687-1743) who worked his way up the Dutch East India bureaucracy to become senior merchant and first administrator of Bengal, eventually Director of Bengal for the VOC. Measuring 9″ in diameter and in very good condition.  Circa 1735.

 

European Subject “Hussar’ Plate #7619

A rather rare Chinese export porcelain 9″ plate decorated with Famille Rose enamels with a rare European subject depicted The Wounded Hussar, obviously made for the Western market and taken from a mezzotint of the same name after a painting by George Carter, c. 1776. The central image bordered with a lattice edge and centered at the top with a shield and crest with a pseudo cipher.   Perhaps commissioned to celebrate an enemy’s humiliating defeat?  Circa 1780. $4,200.00

 

American Market ‘Arms of Alexander’ Plate #4649

A very interesting piece of Chinese export porcelain relating to an American General in the Revolution. This plate is from a service made for Major General William Alexander (1726-1783). Born in New York, he was a distant relation of the Earl Stirling, and when that line ‘died out’ he petitioned Parliament before the war to claim the title. Despite never having been granted that petition, he nonetheless fashioned himself the ‘Earl of Stirling’ and as was customary at the time, ordered an armorial service  bearing the Arms of Alexander quartering MacDonald which is finely rendered here on this plate, a central shield with ‘Wild Man’ and ‘Mermaid’ supporters. Sadly, hostilities broke out and the service probably never got beyond the East India warehouses in London before William Alexander died in 1783. Despite his aspirations to a noble title, Alexander went on to have a very impressive military record for the American cause serving in New York and New Jersey as well as at Valley Forge, Brandywine, German town and Philadelphia, being made a Major General in 1777.  Measuring 9″ in diameter and in very good condition, dating to circa 1775.

Handsome 13″ ‘Arms of Oliphant’ Dish #7343

A very fine Chinese export porcelain quatrefoil-form serving dish, made for the English market, bearing the Arms of Oliphant impaling Browne. Measuring 9″ x 13″ and in very good condition, one of three services made with these arms, and dating to circa 1800, though the dealer label from Matthew and Elisabeth Sharpe have it dated a bit earlier. Discussed and illustrated in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. I, page 725.    $1250.

Extremely Fine Pair of Yongzheng Period ‘Arms of Frederick’ Plates #7263A

A very fine pair of Chinese export porcelain early Yongzheng period armorial plates made for the English market, richly decorated and detailed with an elaborate central coat-of arms for the Frederick family, Baronets of Westminster, an early promoter of the South Sea Company. Measuring 8 3/4″ in diameter and in very good condition with only a small chip to the reverse of one. Illustrated and discussed in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. I, page 202, and we are grateful to Angela Howard of Heirloom & Howard for information she has provided. Circa 1724.

Very Beautiful Yongzheng Period: the ‘Arms of Frederick’ Saucer Dishes #7263B (Sold individually)

An exemplary pair of Chinese export porcelain Yongzheng period saucer dishes from a bespoke armorial service made for the English market, bearing the Arms of the of Frederick, Baronets of Westminster. Measuring 8 3/4″ in diameter and in good condition with only an inch-long line to one dish from the rim, otherwise superlative decoration and great form from a much-sought-after period of porcelain production. Discussed and illustrated in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. I, page 202, and we are grateful to information provided by Angela Howard of Heirloom and Howard. With a provenance going back to the beginning of the 20th century with the Century House in London, preeminent antiques dealers who catered to the leading collectors of the day. Circa 1724.  $1,450.00 each.

Great Pair of Yongzheng Period Armorial Soup Plates: The Arms of Savage #7262. (Sold individually)

Another fine pair of Chinese export porcelain armorial pieces from our collection, here,a handsome pair of finely decorated 8 3/4″ soup plates made for the English market and bearing the Arms of Savage.  Technically, it is Savage impaling another family, but the second clan remain unidentified at this point. Regardless, the service demonstrates the rich detail and fine quality of the Yongzheng period. Very good condition. Discussed and illustrated in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. I, page 205, and we are grateful to Angela Howard of Heirloom & Howard for information provided. Circa 1724.

Extremely Rare Canadian Armorial Plate #7025

A very rare Chinese export porcelain plate made for the Canadian market, centered with the arms of a Canadian trading company. The armorial design features a central shield with images of the four sources of wealth of the Canadian trade: whale, fish, beaver and mink, with human supporters in the form of Britannia  with a ship’s mast, a cornucopia at her feet, and the “noble savage” of the wilderness with his bow, arrows, beaver, and a black bear, the crest rendered as a globe surmounted by a trading ship. All within diapered and spearhead borders in underglaze blue. Measuring 9 3/4″ in diameter and in very good condition. Discussed and illustrated in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, vol. I, Page 715. Circa 1795.

 

Export for the Russian Imperial Market-PAIR of Catherine the Great Plates #7070

An outstanding pair of Chinese export porcelain dinner plates from a service made for Catherine the Great of Russia, each centered with the Imperial double-headed eagle supporting a shield with an image of St. George slaying the dragon. The rim with a delicate ribbon and flowering vine-entwined border, a device most likely from French or English ceramics of the period. Catherine the Great (1729-1796) reigned from 1762 and is Russia’s longest reigning female monarch, responsible for expanding and westernizing her country. Measuring  9 1/2″ in diameter and in very good condition. Circa 1780. Priced individually.

 

 

 

 

Fine Pair of CHAPMAN Armorials #4923 One Sold; One Available

A fantastic example of Chinese export special order armorial porcelain made for the English market, these fine plates are from a service bearing the Arms of Chapman quarterly impaling Wood quarterly with Edmundson in pretence. These elaborate and flamboyantly rendered arms with their Latin motto fill the well of the plate within a gilded spearhead cavetto border, the rim decorated with an understated rendering of elegant flowering peony branches in bianco-sopra-bianco. Services such as these were de rigueur status symbols for the English nobility of the 18th century, advertising their wealth and connections. Discussed and illustrated in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, vol. I, page 411. Measuring 9″ in diameter, and in very good condition. Circa 1740.  $1,500.00 each.