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American Eagle Tea Bowl and Saucer #7470c

A good example of Chinese export porcelain made for the American market, this tea bowl and saucer are simply decorated in the Federal taste  of our new republic – “plain and neat” –  each piece centered with a sepia eagle bearing a red striped shield beneath a star-studded halo, the design taken from an early version of the Great Seal of the United States.  In good condition with only some minor enamel and gilding wear, the saucer measuring 5 1/2″ in diameter, the tea bowl 3 1/2″.  Circa 1800.  $650.00

Impressive CATESBY JONES Mazzarene and Platter #7633

A very beautiful and impressively-sized Chinese export porcelain mazzarene and platter, made for the American market, and bearing the initials CMJ within a central crested scrolled, each piece edged with a rich sepia and gilt grapevine border. The initials stand for Catesby and Mary Jones of Virginia who were married in 1823. Catesby (1790-1858) had a distinguished career in the early United States Navy.  He trained with Isaac Hull and Stephen Decatur in Norfolk, Virginia before going on to service in suppressing the slave trade, smuggling, and piracy.  He also commanded the Pacific Squadron in 1825, 1842 and in 1844 during the Mexican War. Discussed in Schiffer’s China for America, p. 84.   17″ x 14″.  Circa 1820-1825.

 

American Neoclassical Swag Decorated Teapot # 7568

A handsome Chinese export porcelain drum teapot with strap handles, from a service made for the American market, decorated with a rich orange and gilded neoclassical style swag border and centered with a sepia landscape roundel surmounted by the original owner’s initials RB. This is the third example of this service that we know of and the other two were made for identifiable American families, so this must have  been a popular pattern at the time in the latest neoclassical taste. Very good condition.  Circa 1800. Very good condition with only slight wear to the gilding. $950.00

CHEW Family of Philadelphia Pots-de-Cremes #7443

Three charming Chinese export porcelain pots-de-cremes from a service ordered by Benjamin Chew of Philadelphia for use by his family at their country estate Cliveden which still stands today, each piece decorated with a gilded C within a starburst roundel.  Benjamin Chew (1722-1810) trained as a lawyer in London before returning to Philadelphia around 1736 where he embarked upon a long and prosperous career holding various posts before and during the American revolution including Chief Justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. Discussed and illustrated in Philadelphians and the China Trade, pages 44-52.  One cup with a line from the rim, the other two cups in good condition, the covers with restorations. Late 18th century.  $425.00 each.

 

New York State Arms Tea Bowl and Saucer #7551

A Chinese export porcelain tea bowl and saucer made for the American market, specifically for the New York market as it from a service bearing the Arms of the State of New York.  Patriotically-themed services such as this were ordered in the early years of the Republic as a show of pride and loyalty to either specific states or our fledgling nation.  The saucer measuring 5 1/2″ in diameter and with three hairlines; the tea bowl 3 1/2″ in diameter and in good condition with only some enamel wear.  Circa 1790-1800. $375.00

 

American Market Ridgway Eagle-Decorated Plates #7549

A very handsome pair of Chinese export porcelain barbed rim 8″ plates with a central American eagle decoration based upon an early version of the Great Seal of the United States, all within a striking sawtooth border. Part of a rather impressive 416-piece service made for wealthy businessman John Jacob Ridgway of Philadelphia (1768-1843) who was American Consul to Antwerp, Belgium in the first years of the 19th century.  The service was most likely made for that diplomatic sojourn. Very good condition, circa 1800.  $1,450.00 each.

“Cow Pox Innoculation” Breakfast Tea Bowl, Saucer #7365

Rare American market “Cow Pox Innoculation” Breakfast Tea Bowl and Saucer

A rather rare Chinese export porcelain breakfast tea bowl and saucer made for the American market of medical and historical interest.  These pieces are from a service ordered for Dr. Benjamin Waterhouse of Cambridge, Massachusetts, (1746-1846) a Harvard professor who in 1800 successfully innoculated his own children with the cowpox vaccine against smallpox. A tea service was consequentially ordered with this cow imagery to commemorate and promote the practice as it seems vaccines were as controversial then as they are today.  Fully illustrated and discussed in Schiffer’s China for America, pages 174-175.  The tea bowl measuring 4 1/4″, the saucer 5 1/2″ in diameter. Two lines sealed and two small pieces out, and restored, to the tea bowl and two lines sealed to the saucer.  Circa 1805. $1,200.00 each.

Pair of Gilt Edged Eagle Plates #7551

A handsome pair of Chinese export porcelain 8″ plates made for the American market, each centered with a early version of the American eagle taken from the Great Seal of the United States, this version shown supporting a floral shield, within a broad gilt border. Very good condition with only very slight wear to the enamel. Circa 1800-1810. Priced individually

 

American Market Tablewares, Nantucket Provenance

A group of fine Chinese export porcelain tablewares made for the American market, vibrantly edged in a beautiful apple green border with gilded detail – each piece with a small gilded floral sprig. In addition to their decorative quality, they have a history of descent in the Russell-Macy-Starbuck families of Nantucket. The simple design would have appealed to the Quaker aesthetic of these prominent island families at the time and the apple green enamel border was relatively rare on Chinese export wares as we know of only one other service made for the American market and that went into New haven, CT.  The group comprises; a large 15″ oval platter; an 11″ reticulated basket and undertray and a pair of covered strap-handled pots-de-cremes. All in very good condition with only the basket handles with restoration and they appear to be original. Early 19th century. $2,800.00 the group.

 

American Market Silsbee Pots de Creme #7431 Tureen Sold

A very attractive pair of covered pots-de-creme from a dinner service made for one of New England’s prominent maritime trading families. The service was made for Nathaniel Silsbee (1773-1850) of Salem, Massachusetts a sixth generation descendant of the family and each piece is monogrammed with a gilded S.  Nathaniel left school at 14 and went to sea and within six years was given command of a ship belonging to Salem’s merchant prince, Elias Haskett Derby. This American success story continued with Nathaniel retiring at age 28 from his shipping business, marrying the very wealthy Mary Crowninshield, and moving on to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives, the Massachusetts House of Representatives, the Massachusetts State Senate, and the U.S. Senate…he deserved a nice dinner service! These lovely pieces are hand-painted in sepia with “Auspicious Figures” alternating with clusters of  “Hundred Antiques” and, though not readily visible in the photos, are meticulously detailed throughout with gilded highlights. Very slight loss to some gilding otherwise great condition, each measuring about 3 1/4″ tall. Circa 1810.   $850.00 each.                                                             And with many thanks to Charles and Sandy Cluthe for their brilliant research.

 

 

 

  

Plates from the Captain Richard Dale Service #7481

A very attractive pair of Chinese export porcelain 6″ plates made for the American Market, each decorated in overglaze blue and gilding and centered with a classical urn surrounded by a sawtooth cavetto border, the outer rim edge with an elegant scrolling gilded border. In addition to being such a fine design, the plates are part of a service ordered by American Captain Richard Dale (1756-1826) on his last trip to Canton in 1799. Dale’s naval service included working with the likes of John Barry and John Paul Jones. After the Revolution, he sailed under private contract to canton in the burgeoning American China Trade before re-joining the Navy in 1799. Illustrated and discussed in Schiffer’s China for America, page 204. Both plates in very good condition with fine gilded detail intact. $290.00 each,

 

Chew Family of Philadelphia Pots de Creme #7443

A charming pair of Chinese export porcelain pots-de-creme, made for the American market, each hand-painted with a gilded sunburst design centered with the monogram C, from a service ordered for the CHEW family of Philadelphia, almost certainly Benjamin Chew (1722-1810). Benjamin, held numerous public offices and he and his very prominent family are fully discussed in Philadelphia and the China Trade, pages 44-52.  They kept a townhouse in Third Street in Philadelphia as well as a fine country estate named Cliveden in Gernmantown, which still stands today.  The sunburst motif seems to have been a locally favorite design as there are other Philadelphia area dinner services that were ordered with that motif. The pots-de-creme are in good condition, measuring 3 1/2″ tall, and exhibit a bit of molded detail both to the cover and around the base that one does not usually see on other plainer Export porcelain examples from the period. Circa 1795-1805.

American Ship Lighthouse Form Coffee Pot #7423

A handsome Chinese export porcelain lighthouse form coffee pot made for the American market, decorated en grisaille with an image of a bird (an eagle?) perched atop a neoclassical urn resting upon a plinth bearing the gilded monogram CB, along with a partial image of a ship flying an American flag from its stern.  The initials are most likely those of either the ship’s captain or supercargo, as yet unidentified, who would have commissioned a coffee and tea service with their monogram. There are several versions of this pattern-both for the English and American markets. This piece, in very good condition, and measuring 10 1/2″ tall, dates to circa 1800-1810.

American Market ‘Arms of Alexander’ Plate #4649

A very interesting piece of Chinese export porcelain relating to an American General in the Revolution. This plate is from a service made for Major General William Alexander (1726-1783). Born in New York, he was a distant relation of the Earl Stirling, and when that line ‘died out’ he petitioned Parliament before the war to claim the title. Despite never having been granted that petition, he nonetheless fashioned himself the ‘Earl of Stirling’ and as was customary at the time, ordered an armorial service  bearing the Arms of Alexander quartering MacDonald which is finely rendered here on this plate, a central shield with ‘Wild Man’ and ‘Mermaid’ supporters. Sadly, hostilities broke out and the service probably never got beyond the East India warehouses in London before William Alexander died in 1783. Despite his aspirations to a noble title, Alexander went on to have a very impressive military record for the American cause serving in New York and New Jersey as well as at Valley Forge, Brandywine, German town and Philadelphia, being made a Major General in 1777.  Measuring 9″ in diameter and in very good condition, dating to circa 1775.

Rare American Market “Cowpox” Commemorative Tea Bowls and Saucers #7265 ONE SOLD

Two rather rare and unusual Chinese export porcelain tea bowls and saucers made for the American Market, specifically ordered for Dr. Benjamin Waterhouse (1754-1846) of Cambridge MA. Each piece is decorated with a simple bucolic image of a cow within a roundel bordered with a chain of interlocked circles. The bovine decoration is actually commemorating (and perhaps advertising?) Dr. Waterhouse’s successful inoculation of his own children with the cowpox vaccine and their subsequent survival against smallpox. Although the treatment had been around since the early 1700s, it was still a rather frightening and controversial cure. Discussed and illustrated in Schiffer’s China for America, pages 174-175. One tea bowl and saucer and one breakfast bowl and saucer. Restored. Circa 1805.

 

Fine American Market Eagle-Decorated Saucer Dish #7370c

A very attractive Chinese export porcelain 7 3/4″ saucer dish made for the American market and centered with a hand-painted sepia image of an American eagle taken from an early version of the Great Seal of the United States and within a wide outer grapevine border most likely inspired from English designs of the period. From a service made for Edward Carrington of Providence, Rhode Island (1775-1843). He served as a supercargo and resided in Canton from 1802-1810 where he was eventually made U.S. Consul. He amassed a considerable fortune in trade during and after his return from Canton; his grand house still stands in Providence. In very good condition and one of the most attractive of the American market services produced. Circa 1810.

American Market New York Gov. Clinton Plates #7262

Not only fine examples of Chinese export porcelain, this beautiful  pair of 10″ dinner plates has an important American connection as they are from a service made for New York Governor DeWitt Clinton and his wife. Clinton was a huge champion of the building of the Erie Canal which propelled New York City into the economic and financial power house which it is to this day. The service itself must have provided the Clintons and their guests with a luxurious and cosmopolitan treat with its finely rendered Chinese landscape and border of exotic figures of the ‘Eight Immortals’. Very good condition with only slight stacking wear and one minute rim frit. Circa 1810-1820. The only known service of this design.

American Market Eagle-Decorated Cups and Saucers #7259

Two very beautiful Chinese export porcelain handled cups and saucers with each piece centered with a finely painted sepia American eagle, taken from an early version of the Great Seal of the United States, and each bordered with a vibrantly enameled grapevine border-most likely taken from an English pattern design of the period. From a service made for Edward Carrington of Providence, R.I. who became a prominent China Trade merchant, shipping magnate and US Consul to Canton from 1802-1810.  He returned to Providence in 1811, having amassed a fortune in China trading on his own behalf.   ……

 

Rare Eagle-Decorated American Market Tea Bowl and Saucer #4923

A fine Chinese export porcelain tea bowl and saucer made for the American market, decorated with a sepia and gilt eagle, supporting a monogrammed shield bearing the initials HLH, all within a gilded grapevine border. From a service made for the Heminway family of New York, the maternal forebears of the Low family of New York and Salem, MA, very prosperous merchants in the China trade. The eagle appears to be after a design for the first Great Seal of the United States. The saucer measuring 5 1/2″ in diameter, the tea bowl 3 1/2″. Some wear to the gilded border, a line sealed in the saucer and two small pieces out of the rim of the tea bowl, sealed back in. The eagle a very finely rendered example from this period, circa 1790-1810. Ex-Elinor Gordon Collection.

 

 

Important American Market Cider Jug 10″ #7064 ( 1 of 2)

A very fine Chinese export porcelain covered cider jug made for the American market with an early naval and maritime connection. One of two cider jugs (see Item #7063) made for Henry Eckford (1775-1832) a Scottish immigrant who became one of America’s finest shipbuilders and designers. Eckford trained with his uncle in Quebec before re-locating to New York in 1796 where he rapidly gained a reputation as a brilliant shipwright and organizer whose quality ships helped New York gain an ascendancy over Philadelphia as America’s leading port. He built ships for John Jacob Astor’s burgeoning trading empire and, during the War of 1812, he won a contract from the U.S. government to build ships on the Great Lakes. He prospered greatly and had a grand house in New York and when financial reversals struck, he rebuilt his fortunes by constructing a 26-gun corvette, sailing it to Constantinople, and selling it to Sultan Mahmud II for $150,000.00. He was a great favorite of the Sultan’s and gained further commissions from him before succumbing to cholera in 1832, his body returning to New York aboard the ship Henry Eckford.

This finely painted jug displays a roundel with the gilded monogram of Henry Eckford, alternating with famille rose bouquets, the rim and cover with elaborately gilded borders on an orange ground. Measuring 10″ tall .   Restoration to rim of spout, small line to the handle and line to base , and re-touch to the gilding. Circa 1805.

Impressively Sized Dewitt Clinton Platter #7046

A fine example of one of the more lavishly decorated of the American Market services, this handsome Chinese export porcelain oval platter bears the gilded monogram of Dewitt and Maria Franklin Clinton on the rim above a beautifully painted Chinese riverscape, the border animated with images of the Eight Immortals and their attributes. Clinton, (1769-1828) was a New York City mayor before going on to Governor’s office where he was instrumental in promoting the building of the Erie Canal which led to New York  becoming a world center for trade and finance. Measuring 13″ x 15 1/2″ and in very good condition. Illustrated and discussed in Schiffer’s China for America, page 94.  Circa 1810-1820. $6,700.00

 

Rare American Market Derby Soup Plate #6088

A very fine example of Chinese export porcelain made for the early American republic, this beautiful soup plate is centered with a sepia image of HOPE and her anchor above a banner supported by palm fronds reading SPERO, the top of the rim centered with a gilded monogram of EHD for Elias Haskett Derby, one of the wealthiest and most prominent merchant traders of Salem, and, all of New England. This soup plate was part of the 272 piece service brought back by Derby from his maiden voyage to China in 1785-1786. Measuring 9″ in diameter and in very good condition. Examples to be found in the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem.  $6,500.00

 

American Market/Rhode Island Eagle Teabowl & Saucer #5009

A fine example of Chinese export porcelain made for the American market, in this case Rhode Island, decorated with a version of the American eagle behind on oval reserve  with the gilded initials JF for John Brown Francis (1791-1864), at one time the state’s governor and then one of its U.S. Senators. The cup measuring 4 3/8″ in diameter, the saucer 6 1/4″, both pieces in good condition, slight re-touch to the gilding. Early 19th century.

Philadelphia/American Market Chew-Wilcox Dish #5024

One of the loveliest services made for the American market, this Chinese export porcelain 7 3/4″ pudding dish is richly decorated with a peach ground  border and roundel meticulously decorated with a sepia and gilded Regency-style border, the roundel centered with a rearing lion above a cranellated wall, the crest of the Chew-Wilcox family of Philadelphia, prominent China trade merchants of the early 19th century. The dish is in excellent condition and the service dates to circa 1810.    $1850.

Pieces from the Nicholas Brown, Jr. Dinner Service

En suite with our offering of a Nicholas Brown, Jr. part dinner service, we have several pieces from that group of fine American market Chinese export priced individually and comprising: 9 1/2″ dinner plates ($1,600.00 each); 6″ side plates ($550.00 each) and 7 1/2″ plates ($1,050.00 each). Beautiful overglaze blue enameled and gilded drape and shield within underglaze blue spearhead and lattice outer borders. All in excellent condition. Circa 1800.

 

 

Rare American Market Pots de Creme

A charming pair of Chinese export porcelain pots de creme made for the American market, each decorated with bands of  a rare apple green enamel with gilded details and centered with gilded floral sprigs. From a service made for the Russell family of Nantucket who settled on the island in the early 18th century and  married amongst the island’s elite with Starbucks, Macys and Barnards to name a few. This rare green color must have been difficult to produce as it only seems to appear on export wares for a brief period in the early 19th century. Each measuring approximately 3″ tall. One in very good condition, the other with a small chip to the underside of the cover and restoration to the handle. Circa 1800-1810. $1,450.00 the pair.

American Market/Rhode Island Rogers Tea Wares #4926

A very fortuitous find to compliment our Nicholas Brown part tea set, this very fine grouping of Chinese export teawares for the American market bears the same double-heart decoration as the Nicholas Brown service, and with no wonder, as it was made for one of Nicholas’ early business partner John Rogers (1756-1810). Rogers was a sixth generation descendant of Thomas Rogers, a Mayflower passenger and signer of the Mayflower compact. The Rogers were amongst the earliest settlers in Rhode Island, arriving in Newport around 1638.  John Rogers was an original partner in the Providence firm of Brown, Rogers and Benson. This firm was the predecessor to Brown and Ives, a powerful banking and mercantile company originally built around the China Trade,  but transitioning to investment in American cotton spinning mills by the mid 19th century. John married Elizabeth Rodman Rogers, hence the initials on this set of JER. This service was undoubtedly ordered at the same time as the Nicholas and Anne Brown monogrammed service given the close business and social circles that connected the Brown and Rogers families. Very good condition. Old restoration to pitcher where the handle meets the top of the body, otherwise very good condition with bright enamels and gilding. Coffeepot SOLD. Pieces priced individually. Circa 1800.

Rare American Market Mt. Vernon Dish #4849 sold

A very fine and rare Chinese export porcelain 7 1/4″ saucer dish made for the American market, decorated en grisaille with a central roundel depicting a view of George Washington’s Mt. Vernon, the rim edged with a gilded and grisaille grapevine border. From a service ordered by Captain Daniel Bacon, an early 19th century China trader and ship’s master from Boston and Barnstable, Massachusetts. The view of Mt. Vernon was taken from an engraving of the period, and the service was most likely a patriotic tribute to Washington after his death in 1799, part of a cult of mourning that swept the young Republic in the beginning of the 19th century. Very good condition; slight wear to the gilding. Circa 1810-1820.

 

Important American Market Tree Teawares #4578 (A Few Remaining)

Another very beautiful, and very important example of China Trade porcelain for the American Market, these spectacular teawares are from a service ordered for Lambert and Elizabeth Tree of Philadelphia. Lambert was prominent sailmaker and merchant who amassed a great fortune outfitting Philadelphia’s burgeoning mercantile fleet during the early years of the republic. Each piece is finely decorated with a orange and gilded swagged border, centered with a sepia landscape roundel and inscribed with a gilded monogram “LET”. Lambert served a nine year apprenticeship to attain his profession and a copy of his indenture still exists. Teabowls and saucers and 7 1/4″ plates available. Circa 1800.