Pair of Vaughan Hallowell Armorial Soup Plates #7441c

A superb pair of Chinese export porcelain octagonal armorial soup plates of interest to both American and English market collectors as it is one of three services made for Samuel Vaughan, an English merchant and planter in Jamaica, who married Bostonian Sarah Hallowell in 1747.  They relocated to England, but a large portion of the service returned to America after the Revolution when part of the family moved to Hallowell, Maine where they played a prominent role in settling the area in the new republic.  Each piece centered with the arms of Vaughan impaling Hallowell, finely painted, the rims of the plates scattered with floral sprigs, illustrated and discussed on page 576 in Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, Vol. II. Each measuring 8 1/2″ across; one with two small rim chips on the reverse filled, the other with glaze lines on the reverse which do not show through, otherwise splendid enamels in good condition. Circa 1770.

Rare Equestrian Hunting Punch Bowl #7425

A rather rare Chinese export porcelain punch bowl decorated with equestrian hunting motifs, finely painted with two sepia roundels depicting huntsmen with their horses and hounds, alternating with two roundels depicting country house landscapes. The images and bowl rim edged with overglaze blue and gilded borders, the bottom interior with a basket of flowers design. It is suggested that these bowls were made for export to not only England but also for the American mid-Atlantic and southern colonies where the English aristocratic lifestyle with pursuits, such a fox hunting, was emulated. This is a fine example measuring 13 1/2″ in diameter with three lines restored, otherwise in very good condition, especially the finely rendered scenes-most likely taken from engravings of the period.  A similar example in the collections at Winterthur. Circa 1785.

Pair of Extremely Rare Thomas Jefferson Pots-de-Creme #7437

A truly extraordinary example of Chinese export porcelain made for the American market, this beautiful pair of  covered pots-de-cremes is from a service made for our third, and one of our greatest, American presidents, Thomas Jefferson. The pattern-a simple underglaze blue spearhead border with gilded highlights, typical of the aesthetic of the Federal period-is augmented with an armorial crest surmounted by knight’s helmet flanked by flourishes and bellflower swags above a shield centered with a gilded initial J.  With a long history of descent in the Jefferson family, this service was auctioned off after Jefferson’s death in 1826 by his granddaughter Ellen Wayles Randolph, part of a massive sale of personal property made necessary by the staggering debt in which Jefferson left his estate. The service was later reacquired by Ellen Randolph’s grandson for the family and pieces were eventually lent out to various public collections for exhibition; four pieces were donated to the White House in 1906 and are still in their possession. It has been suggested that Governor and Mrs. Christopher Gore of Massachusetts, while on a diplomatic mission to London, ordered the service for President Jefferson as they ordered an identical one for themselves with the initial G. With many thanks to Becky McGuire, Christies, New York for her research. This specific pair of pots-de-creme has a history of descent in the family of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge of Boston. Both pieces in fine condition, measuring 3″ tall. Circa 1800-1810.

American Market 10 1/4″ Ship Punch Bowl #7440

With a rather rare American ship decoration, this fine  Chinese export porcelain punch bowl is centered front and back with a hand-painted image of a three-masted  frigate or sloop flying what is referred to as a Jack Flag with a navy blue ground with gold stars. This flag was flown on our ships from 1777 until 1916 and designated the presence of an ambassador or minister of the diplomatic corps on board. This bowl has a mate in the Reeves Collection and is illustrated and discussed on page 212 of Thomas Litzenburg, Jr.’s book Chinese Export Porcelain in the Reeves Collection at Washington and Lee University. Measuring 10 1/4″ in diameter and dating to circa 1795. Two lines and restoration.

 

Chew Family of Philadelphia Pots de Creme #7443

A charming pair of Chinese export porcelain pots-de-creme, made for the American market, each hand-painted with a gilded sunburst design centered with the monogram C, from a service ordered for the CHEW family of Philadelphia, almost certainly Benjamin Chew (1722-1810). Benjamin, held numerous public offices and he and his very prominent family are fully discussed in Philadelphia and the China Trade, pages 44-52.  They kept a townhouse in Third Street in Philadelphia as well as a fine country estate named Cliveden in Gernmantown, which still stands today.  The sunburst motif seems to have been a locally favorite design as there are other Philadelphia area dinner services that were ordered with that motif. The pots-de-creme are in good condition, measuring 3 1/2″ tall, and exhibit a bit of molded detail both to the cover and around the base that one does not usually see on other plainer Export porcelain examples from the period. Circa 1795-1805.

American Ship Tea Caddy and Cover #7418A

A nice example of Chinese export porcelain made for the American market, this dome-shouldered tea caddy is hand-painted on both sides with an image of a three-masted ship under sail, proudly flying two American flags. Small restoration to cover and neck, otherwise good condition. Measuring 4 1/4″ tall x 3″ wide. Circa 1800.

Rare American Market “Cow Pox” 5 1/2″ Bowl #7434

A charming Chinese export porcelain 5 1/2″ bowl made for the American market, from a tea service ordered by Dr. Benjamin Waterhouse of Cambridge, MA. (1754-1846). Inscribed with the gilded initial W within a chain-link bordered roundel featuring the images of two cows in a pasture. The bucolic imagery was not only decorative but also an advertisement for innoculation by cowpox as a preventative vaccine against smallpox. Though the innoculation had been known since early in the 18th century, it was still a very controversial procedure (as it remains today). Dr. Waterhouse innoculated his own children with this method and commemorated the event with a special order tea set. Discussed and illustrated in Schiffer’s China for America, page 174. This bowl most likely the slop bowl from the tea set, with three lines restored, but charming imagery beautifully intact. Circa 1800.

Superb Pair of Vaughan Hallowell Plates with Original Bookplate #7427 SOLD

A very handsome pair of Chinese export porcelain octagonal form plates, meticulously hand-painted en grisaille with the Arms of Vaughan impaling Hallowell within an elaborate rococo style cartouche and inscribed beneath Samuel Vaughan, the plate rims with delicate bird and landscape vignettes. This is one of three services made for this family and it holds both interesting English and American connections. Samuel Vaughan was a wealthy merchant and Jamaican plantation owner who married Sarah Hallowell of Boston in 1747. Their son, Benjamin Vaughan, though he couldn’t attend elite schools in England because the family were Unitarians, managed to be tutored by famous scientist Joseph Priestly and later graduated from Edinburgh University with a degree in medicine. By the time he had immigrated to Hallowell, Maine in 1799 to land inherited from his mother, he had made the acquaintance of Benjamin Franklin, John Jay and John Adams. Living in remote Maine, he managed to keep a library of similar size to Harvard’s and he garnered degrees from both Harvard and Bowdoin College.                                                                                                                                                                          The plates are in remarkably fine condition, with virtually no wear to the delicate grisaille decoration which was finely rendered to resemble the bookplate engraving that had been sent to Canton to copy. The bookplate, which is in fine condition and suitably framed, is not only an interesting design source pertaining to the commission of the dinner service, but itself was designed by Thomas Chippendale!                                                                                                      The plates are illustrated and discussed in Schiffer’s China for America, page 34, as well as Howard’s Chinese Armorial Porcelain, vol. I, page 359.                From a private Boston, Beacon Hill collection.   Circa 1750.

 

 

 

 

American Market Ship Teapot #7415 Sold

An exceptional Chinese export porcelain drum form teapot with a double strap handle from a service made for the American market decorated with a hand-painted rendering of a three masted ship flying two American flags. There are several ship-decorated services from this early period of the American China trade and this version is considered one of the finest. From the former collection of Elinor Gordon and once exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Slight crazing to some small areas,  line sealed across base. Circa 1810.

American Market Ship Tea Caddy # 7418B

Another good example from our collection of Chinese export porcelains made for the early American Market, this fine dome shouldered tea caddy is hand-painted on both sides with an image a three-masted ship, its sails furled, flying two American flags of the early republic. Measuring 4″ tall x 3″ wide and with slight crazing and a small restoration to the neck; otherwise very good condition and a fine example of an image from our early maritime history.  Circa 1800. $1,650.00

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