American Market Ship Teapot #7415 Sold

An exceptional Chinese export porcelain drum form teapot with a double strap handle from a service made for the American market decorated with a hand-painted rendering of a three masted ship flying two American flags. There are several ship-decorated services from this early period of the American China trade and this version is considered one of the finest. From the former collection of Elinor Gordon and once exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Slight crazing to some small areas,  line sealed across base. Circa 1810.

American Market “Quaker and Cow” Tea Bowl #7433 Sold

An especially fine example in superb condition, this Chinese export porcelain tea bowl is decorated en grisaille in the “Quaker and Cow” pattern. This design has a long association with the Philadelphia Hollingsworth-Morris family, one Mary Hollingsworth Morris having sent a drawing to Canton which was interpreted onto a tea service. There are several versions of this design, this one being one of the finest quality with the hand-painted detail coming close to the precision of an engraved transfer print. The bowl measuring 2″ tall by 3 1/2″ in diameter, and in great condition. See Schiffer’s China in America, pages 172-173. Circa 1810.

American Market Ship Tea Caddy # 7418B

Another good example from our collection of Chinese export porcelains made for the early American Market, this fine dome shouldered tea caddy is hand-painted on both sides with an image a three-masted ship, its sails furled, flying two American flags of the early republic. Measuring 4″ tall x 3″ wide and with slight crazing and a small restoration to the neck; otherwise very good condition and a fine example of an image from our early maritime history.  Circa 1800. $1,650.00

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American Market “Mt. Vernon” 7 1/4″ Plate #7432

A rare Chinese export porcelain 7 1/4″ plate made for the American Market, decorated en grisaille with a central scene of George Washington’s Mt. Vernon, surrounded by a grisaille grapevine border with gilded details. From a tea service made for Captain Daniel Bacon of Boston and Barnstable, MA, a wealthy trader and merchant, and owner of  the renown  Game Cock, one of the fastest ships in it’s day.  The image of Mt. Vernon was taken from a period engraving, after a painting of the President’s home. The somber color scheme, part of a cult of mourning in the years following Washington’s death. The grapevine border after a popular English ceramic design of the period. Illustrated and discussed in Schiffer’s China in America, pages 168-170. Very good condition. Circa 1810-1820.

American Ship Lighthouse Form Coffee Pot #7423

A handsome Chinese export porcelain lighthouse form coffee pot made for the American market, decorated en grisaille with an image of a bird (an eagle?) perched atop a neoclassical urn resting upon a plinth bearing the gilded monogram CB, along with a partial image of a ship flying an American flag from its stern.  The initials are most likely those of either the ship’s captain or supercargo, as yet unidentified, who would have commissioned a coffee and tea service with their monogram. There are several versions of this pattern-both for the English and American markets. This piece, in very good condition, and measuring 10 1/2″ tall, dates to circa 1800-1810.

American Market Ship Cups #7416 2 sold

Three charming Chinese export porcelain handled cups made for the American market, each hand-painted with images of three masted ships all flying American flags. Each measuring approximately 2 1/2″ tall, the bigger one of the three with a slightly larger diameter. All bearing collection labels from Elinor Gordon, having been exhibited in the Baltimore Museum of Art.  Wonderful examples of America’s early maritime trade. Lines sealed, otherwise good condition. One of the pair of cups is sold. Circa 1800.

 

Pair of American Market Green Fitzhugh Soup Plates

A handsome pair of Chinese export porcelain 9″ soup plates decorated in a brilliant Green Fitzhugh pattern, each centered with a gilded S, from a service made for the Spooner family of Plymouth, a prominent family whose 18th century house still stands today as a museum. Very good condition. Early 19th century.

 

American Ship Sugar Bowl #7344

From a rare group of identifiable Chinese export porcelain teawares made for the American market, decorated en grisaille,  with a central image of a neoclassical urn resting upon a plinth inscribed with the monogram JB for Captain John Barton  (1774-1818) of Salem, Massachusetts. To the right, is a swagged shield bearing the image of an anchor (the sailor’s symbol of Hope) with two love birds resting upon it, a cartouche below bearing the initials of the captain’s wife LB. And to the left, most remarkably, is the partial image of his ship, flying an American flag, with the stern inscribed ARAB.  This pattern appears on other services-some bearing a British flag, some with inscribed monograms-but seldom does it ever have so much identifiable information as to the ship’s name and captain, let alone his wife. This was a very specific commission, in good condition and dating to circa 1800-1810.

Unusual Size American Market Cider Jug #7405

An unusually small and very attractive Chinese export porcelain strap-handled cider jug made for the American market with a finely rendered sepia rose border, highlighted with bands of peach-colored enamel and gilding, the matching cover surmounted by a gilded foo lion. With the exception of very minor wear to the gilding the piece is in very good condition, the decoration similar to a well-known American market service made for the Van Rensselaer family of New York. Measuring 8″ tall and dating to circa 1810. $1,250.00

 

 

American Market ‘Arms of Alexander’ Plate #4649

A very interesting piece of Chinese export porcelain relating to an American General in the Revolution. This plate is from a service made for Major General William Alexander (1726-1783). Born in New York, he was a distant relation of the Earl Stirling, and when that line ‘died out’ he petitioned Parliament before the war to claim the title. Despite never having been granted that petition, he nonetheless fashioned himself the ‘Earl of Stirling’ and as was customary at the time, ordered an armorial service  bearing the Arms of Alexander quartering MacDonald which is finely rendered here on this plate, a central shield with ‘Wild Man’ and ‘Mermaid’ supporters. Sadly, hostilities broke out and the service probably never got beyond the East India warehouses in London before William Alexander died in 1783. Despite his aspirations to a noble title, Alexander went on to have a very impressive military record for the American cause serving in New York and New Jersey as well as at Valley Forge, Brandywine, German town and Philadelphia, being made a Major General in 1777.  Measuring 9″ in diameter and in very good condition, dating to circa 1775.