Unusual Size American Market Cider Jug #7405

An unusually small and very attractive Chinese export porcelain strap-handled cider jug made for the American market with a finely rendered sepia rose border, highlighted with bands of peach-colored enamel and gilding, the matching cover surmounted by a gilded foo lion. With the exception of very minor wear to the gilding the piece is in very good condition, the decoration similar to a well-known American market service made for the Van Rensselaer family of New York. Measuring 8″ tall and dating to circa 1810. $1,250.00

 

 

American Market ‘Arms of Alexander’ Plate #4649

A very interesting piece of Chinese export porcelain relating to an American General in the Revolution. This plate is from a service made for Major General William Alexander (1726-1783). Born in New York, he was a distant relation of the Earl Stirling, and when that line ‘died out’ he petitioned Parliament before the war to claim the title. Despite never having been granted that petition, he nonetheless fashioned himself the ‘Earl of Stirling’ and as was customary at the time, ordered an armorial service  bearing the Arms of Alexander quartering MacDonald which is finely rendered here on this plate, a central shield with ‘Wild Man’ and ‘Mermaid’ supporters. Sadly, hostilities broke out and the service probably never got beyond the East India warehouses in London before William Alexander died in 1783. Despite his aspirations to a noble title, Alexander went on to have a very impressive military record for the American cause serving in New York and New Jersey as well as at Valley Forge, Brandywine, German town and Philadelphia, being made a Major General in 1777.  Measuring 9″ in diameter and in very good condition, dating to circa 1775.

Unusual Centennial ‘Declaration of Independence’ Spoon #7377

A very unusual Chinese export porcelain spoon, made for the American market, depicting a scene with Founding Fathers at the signing of the Declaration of Independence, beneath a spread eagle, taken from a Currier and Ives print, after John Trumbull’s original painting of the scene. This is from a small, rare group of Chinese export porcelain undoubtedly special-ordered, that was created sometime in the late 19th century, after the American Centennial and part of the Colonial Revival movement. Measuring 9″ long and in good condition. Discussed and illustrated in Schiffer’s China for America, page 144.

Fine American Market Eagle-Decorated Part Tea Set #7368

A very fine Chinese export porcelain part tea set made for the American market, each piece hand-painted with a central image of an eagle supporting a striped shield beneath a halo of stars all within a delicate gilded Federal period style border. The image derived almost certainly from an early version of the Great Seal of the United States.  Comprising a lighthouse form coffee pot, a helmet creamer and covered sugar bowl, as well as a slop bowl and four tea bowls and saucers.  Good condition with only a few hairlines sealed and the gilding refreshed. Circa 1800.

Rare American Market “Cowpox” Commemorative Tea Bowls and Saucers #7265

Two rather rare and unusual Chinese export porcelain tea bowls and saucers made for the American Market, specifically ordered for Dr. Benjamin Waterhouse (1754-1846) of Cambridge MA. Each piece is decorated with a simple bucolic image of a cow within a roundel bordered with a chain of interlocked circles. The bovine decoration is actually commemorating (and perhaps advertising?) Dr. Waterhouse’s successful inoculation of his own children with the cowpox vaccine and their subsequent survival against smallpox. Although the treatment had been around since the early 1700s, it was still a rather frightening and controversial cure. Discussed and illustrated in Schiffer’s China for America, pages 174-175. One tea bowl and saucer and one breakfast bowl and saucer. Restored. Circa 1805.

 

Fine American Market Eagle-Decorated Saucer Dish #7370c

A very attractive Chinese export porcelain 7 3/4″ saucer dish made for the American market and centered with a hand-painted sepia image of an American eagle taken from an early version of the Great Seal of the United States and within a wide outer grapevine border most likely inspired from English designs of the period. From a service made for Edward Carrington of Providence, Rhode Island (1775-1843). He served as a supercargo and resided in Canton from 1802-1810 where he was eventually made U.S. Consul. He amassed a considerable fortune in trade during and after his return from Canton; his grand house still stands in Providence. In very good condition and one of the most attractive of the American market services produced. Circa 1810.

American Market New York Gov. Clinton Plates #7262

Not only fine examples of Chinese export porcelain, this beautiful  pair of 10″ dinner plates has an important American connection as they are from a service made for New York Governor DeWitt Clinton and his wife. Clinton was a huge champion of the building of the Erie Canal which propelled New York City into the economic and financial power house which it is to this day. The service itself must have provided the Clintons and their guests with a luxurious and cosmopolitan treat with its finely rendered Chinese landscape and border of exotic figures of the ‘Eight Immortals’. Very good condition with only slight stacking wear and one minute rim frit. Circa 1810-1820. The only known service of this design.

American Market Eagle-Decorated Cups and Saucers #7259

Two very beautiful Chinese export porcelain handled cups and saucers with each piece centered with a finely painted sepia American eagle, taken from an early version of the Great Seal of the United States, and each bordered with a vibrantly enameled grapevine border-most likely taken from an English pattern design of the period. From a service made for Edward Carrington of Providence, R.I. who became a prominent China Trade merchant, shipping magnate and US Consul to Canton from 1802-1810.  He returned to Providence in 1811, having amassed a fortune in China trading on his own behalf.   ……

 

Philadelphia Masonic Cider Jug #7351

A rather rare Chinese export porcelain covered cider jug with double strap handles, made for the American market and extensively decorated with Masonic emblems, a central sunburst roundel beneath the spout inscribed with the letter ‘G’, the foo-lion topped cover and rim both with a richly rendered grapevine border. Fantastic detail and condition.  Virtually identical, or most likely a mate to, the one featured on page 209 of the book Philadelphians and the China Trade 1784-1844 where they describe it as having belonged to the “Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania”.   A great example of early American and Masonic history, as well as special order China Trade porcelain. Early 19th century.       $6,800.