Great Form American Market-“Quaker Farmer” Shell-Shaped Dish #7255 HOLD

A very desirable form and a very popular design, this Chinese export porcelain shell-shaped dish is decorated en grisaille with the classic “Quaker and Cow” pattern and highlighted with gilded detailing. The original design purportedly comes from a drawing by Mary Hollingsworth Morris of Philadelphia and several services in sepia, black and green were produced. Measuring 9″ x 10″ and in good condition with only one small chip filled and very minor re-touch to the gilding. Illustrated in Schiffer’s China in America, page 172. Circa 1810. HOLD

Rare Eagle-Decorated American Market Tea Bowl and Saucer #4923

A fine Chinese export porcelain tea bowl and saucer made for the American market, decorated with a sepia and gilt eagle, supporting a monogrammed shield bearing the initials HLH, all within a gilded grapevine border. From a service made for the Hemingway family of New York, the maternal forebears of the Low family of New York and Salem, MA, very prosperous merchants in the China trade. The eagle appears to be after a design for the first Great Seal of the United States. The saucer measuring 5 1/2″ in diameter, the tea bowl 3 1/2″. Some wear to the gilded border, a line sealed in the saucer and two small pieces out of the rim of the tea bowl, sealed back in. The eagle a very finely rendered example from this period, circa 1790-1810. Ex-Elinor Gordon Collection.

American Market ‘Hope’ Tea Bowl and Saucer #7257c

An especially finely painted Chinese export porcelain tea bowl and saucer made for the American market, each piece decorated with a figure of HOPE  and her anchor within an ermine-mantled shield. Most likely made for a prominent merchant or sea captain from the rather maritime state of Rhode Island whose state seal depicts the same figure. Very small frit to the rim of the tea bowl, otherwise both pieces in excellent condition. The saucer measuring 5 1/2″ in diameter, the tea bowl 2″ tall. From a very prominent collection of China Trade American market porcelain. Circa 1790-1800.

Extremely Rare ‘Chief Seattle’ 6″ Plate #7227

An incredibly rare Chinese export porcelain American market commemorative ‘Chief Seattle’ plate, bearing the central image of Chief Seattle (178?-1866) seated within a prunus and bamboo roundel, his name inscribed above on a small banner, all within a blue enameled interlocking ring cavetto border, the rim with gilded branches of peony. Chief Seattle led the Duwamish and Suquamish Tribes as the first Euro-American settlers arrived in the greater Seattle area in the 1850s. Baptized Noah by Catholic missionaries, Chief Seattle was regarded as a firm friend of the white settlers who named the region’s future central city in his honor. He was a respected leader among the Salish tribes, signing the Point Elliot Treaty of 1855 which relinquished tribal claims to most of the area, and opposing Native American attempts to dislodge settlers during the “Indian wars” of 1855-1856.  He retired to the Suquamish Reservation at Port Madison, and died there on June 7 1866. It is most likely that this plate was a commemorative piece on the 50th anniversary of his death.

Chief Seattle, though, is most famous for a speech he made around 1854 when the United States government aggressively offered to buy two million acres of land  then occupied by native people in the Northwest. The speech was Seattle’s reply to President Franklin Pierce’s “offer” to buy the land and it has been described as one of the most beautiful and prophetic statements on the environment ever made.

Measuring 6″ in diameter with two very small line s to the reverse sealed. A remarkably rare image and tribute to a great Native American to be found on Chinese export, or anywhere for that matter.

 

Sauce Tureen with Boston/Fanueil Provenance #6085

A fine Chinese export porcelain covered sauce tureen and stand decorated in underglaze blue with a rather rare landscape view, and with each piece also bearing a small armorial crest of a lion rampant. The crest derives from an English family into which Mary Fanueil Bethunes married and the service descended in the Fanueil family. She was a descendant of the famous Fanueil family of Boston, prominent merchants of Huguenot descent and creators of the well-known Fanueil Hall which still stands as a centerpiece of Boston’s downtown. The unusual decoration is discussed in Ayers’ China for the West, Vol. II, page 546 where the rather singular rendering of the large thatched structure is conjectured to be an actual building taken from a drawing, perhaps someplace along the Pearl River in the environs of Canton. Measuring approximately 8″ long, the piece is in very good condition. It includes a second sauce tureen and stand, which is damaged, but presents well to form as pair. Circa 1790.   $3800.00

American Market Pair of MORGAN Plates #7055 one available

A very fine pair of Chinese export porcelain 7 1/2″ plates made for the American Market and bears the Arms of Morgan, from a service made for John Morgan of Hartford, CT. Carried back on the ship the Empress of China upon which Morgan’s nephew was ship’s carpenter. Very good condition. Circa 1784. Illustrated in Schiffer’s China for America, page 48. ONE Available

American Market Pair of Sepia Fitzhugh Warming Dishes #6057

A fine and rare pair of Chinese export porcelain Sepia Fitzhugh warming dishes, made for the American market, with a direct China Trade connection as they are from a service made for Richard Renshaw Thomson, a one time United States Consul to Canton and a son of a prominent Philadelphia China trader. The service, hand-painted in the elaborate Fitzhugh pattern bears a central roundel with Richard’s  initials. Measuring 10 3/4″ in diameter, both with small lines sealed, one with a virtually indiscernible glaze bubble, otherwise very good condition, and very finely rendered. Discussed in Philadelphia and the China Trade. Circa 1820. 1,450.00 each.

 

American Market Eagle Tea Bowl #7030

A wonderfully rendered American eagle modeled from the Great Seal of the United States centers this charming Chinese export porcelain tea bowl made for the American market of the Federal period. The reverse side of the bowl is decorated with a blue and gold roundel  inscribed with the gilded monogram TAB-undoubtedly the patriotic first owner of this teaset who ordered it-as yest unidentified. There is a line sealed, but otherwise this nice piece of early Americana is in good condition. 3 1/2 in diameter.  Circa 1795-1800.

 

Important American Market Cider Jug 10″ #7064 ( 1 of 2)

A very fine Chinese export porcelain covered cider jug made for the American market with an early naval and maritime connection. One of two cider jugs (see Item #7063) made for Henry Eckford (1775-1832) a Scottish immigrant who became one of America’s finest shipbuilders and designers. Eckford trained with his uncle in Quebec before re-locating to New York in 1796 where he rapidly gained a reputation as a brilliant shipwright and organizer whose quality ships helped New York gain an ascendancy over Philadelphia as America’s leading port. He built ships for John Jacob Astor’s burgeoning trading empire and, during the War of 1812, he won a contract from the U.S. government to build ships on the Great Lakes. He prospered greatly and had a grand house in New York and when financial reversals struck, he rebuilt his fortunes by constructing a 26-gun corvette, sailing it to Constantinople, and selling it to Sultan Mahmud II for $150,000.00. He was a great favorite of the Sultan’s and gained further commissions from him before succumbing to cholera in 1832, his body returning to New York aboard the ship Henry Eckford.

This finely painted jug displays a roundel with the gilded monogram of Henry Eckford, alternating with famille rose bouquets, the rim and cover with elaborately gilded borders on an orange ground. Measuring 10″ tall .   Restoration to rim of spout, small line to the handle and line to base , and re-touch to the gilding. Circa 1805.

Rare American Market-ROSS of Philadelphia Reticulated Undertray #7066

A rather rare find for us, this attractive Chinese export porcelain reticulated undertray with blue diapered border, centered with a sunburst roundel, bears the family crest of JOHN ROSS of  Philadelphia. Ross was a very wealthy and prominent merchant and played an important role in the Revolution being by the Continental Congress to resource crucial war supplies and materiel for the Continental Army. To our knowledge most of the pieces from this service are in museum collections and seldom comes on the market.   $1900.