Pair of Rouge de Fer 11″ Plates

A fine pair of Chinese export porcelain Rouge de Fer 11″ plates elegantly decorated with a bird perched upon a flowering branch of peony, the central scene encircled with a border of bianco-sopra-bianco decoration of peony and phoenix motifs, painstakingly carved into the porcelain when the clay is still leather-hard before firing. One plate restored, the other in good condition. Late Kangxi period, circa 1720.

 

Extremely Rare Ming Period Duck-Form Censor #7388

An especially fine and rare Chinese export Ming period censor in the form of a standing duck. Decorated in underglaze blue, the top part of the figure lifting off for the incense (the smoke stains still within) and the incense rising through the duck’s open beak.  This is a remarkably rare form in remarkably good condition given its age with only glaze losses from wear . Measuring 6″ tall x 8″ wide. Circa 1600.

 

 

Very Fine Pair of Kangxi Plates #7369

A very fine pair of thinly potted Chinese export porcelain plates hand-painted in underglaze blue with images of waterfowl amongst lotus, the scenes unusually unrestricted by borders and covering the entire surface of the plate. Both representative of the level of quality one can expect from the Kangxi period. One with a faint hairline from the rim, otherwise both in very good condition. Measuring 8 1/4″ in diameter. Circa 1690.

Early Jia-Jinq /Wanli 14″ Charger #7368

A boldly decorated Chinese export porcelain dish charger hand-painted in deep underglaze blue with two central figures, a kylin and an elephant, beneath a tree, surrounded within an outer border of swirling dragons alternating with roundels of  four of the eight trigrams of Bagua symbolism. The trigrams are symbolic of naturally occuring processes and inter-related basic principles of reality, balance and equilibrium. Each one can be associated with a particular family member, season, personality trait, direction or animal; the three represented on this charger stand for water, lake, heaven and fire.  The reverse with floral and foliate roundels around the rim border and centered with a calligraphic mark. Measuring 13 1/4″ in diameter and with a small chip to the foot rim and some pitting and grit to the glaze all typical of a piece of this early production. A fine early example, circa 1580.

 

Unusual Chinese Taste Grisaille Soup Plate #7381

A very finely rendered grisaille Chinese export porcelain soup plate with a central scene depicting the Buddhist legend of Pindola who was a Brahmin and a general who became a devout Buddhist. Because of the religion’s pacifism, and Pindola being forbidden to kill anymore, the king ordered him to become a monk and retire to a monastery. While there, he heard a tiger howling during the night and began leaving vegetarian meals for it outside the monastery doors at night. The tiger became tame and docile and Pindola was from then on known as the Taming Tiger Luohan.  Now this is all very interesting, but what are the chances that the recipient of this dinner service in Europe in the mid-18th century knew the Legend of the Tiger Taming Luohan, let alone having specifically ordered this design? Either way, it is a great example of Europe’s unending fascination with the exotic East, and the cross-currents of design that were carried by the China Trade. Measuring 9 1/2″ in diameter and in good condition with only a faint line to the rim and slight stacking wear. Circa 1745-1750.

 

 

Impressive Pair of Kangxi Famille Verte 17 1/2″ Beaker Vases #

A spectacular pair of Chinese export porcelain beaker form vases of impressive size decorated in the famille verte palette with a central band of dragon roundels  edged with a lappet border all against a very finely painted peony and foliate scrolling iron red ground, the rim and foot completed with further intricate verte ground lappet borders. Very good condition considering their age, obviously much appreciated and cared for over the centuries. Measuring 17 1/2″ tall. Dating to circa 1700-1720.

 

EXTREMELY RARE PAIR of Mother of Pearl Mandarin Duck-Form Boxes #7301

An extraordinarily rare and beautiful pair of diminutive Chinese Mandarin duck-form covered boxes, each finely modeled with their heads raised and their bodies overlaid with meticulously carved and detailed mother-of-pearl feathers, both with great charm and personality. A small piece of each back lifts to form the cover of each box and reveals a mother-of-pearl Qianlong mark, again, painstakingly carved out of mother-of-pearl, and each duck nestled, perfectly fitting, into their own custom stand. The Mandarin duck is a popular theme in Chinese art as they mate for life and symbolize marital bliss and harmony. Obviously displaying in all aspects a level of quality denoting an Imperial workshop. Measuring 2 1/2″ tall x  3 1/2″ wide. Early 19th century. A similar pair with less presence and detail sold in Christies London, November 8, 2011, Lot 0218 for 23,750 pounds. 

Fine Chinese Cloisonne Bowl #7284c

A classic Chinese cloisonne bowl finely decorated with an overall floral design-including peony, prunus and chrysanthemum, using an exceptional range of vibrant enamels all set off by the use of a gilded bronze rim and foot, as well as gilded wire separating the cells of enamel. Measuring 6″ in diameter x 2 1/4″ tall and in good condition. Dating to the late Qianlong/Jiajing period, circa 1780-1820. Formerly in the collection of James Graham, the James Graham Gallery, New York,(1915-1991).

Fine Diminutive Scholars Screens

A charming pair of Chinese export diminutive scholars’ screens, each with an elaborately carved frame and stand, inset with a “dreamstone” a thinly cut cross-section of veined stone, often resembling impressionistic landscapes, intended to be placed upon a scholar’s desk for contemplation and meditation. Measuring 10″ x 6″; one with a small line to one of the stones, and both with some very minor lines to the stands. Early 20th century.