Superb Transitional/Kangxi Period Brushpot #7446

A truly beautiful form, and superbly decorated in underglaze blue, this Chinese porcelain brush pot of simple flared cylindrical form is hand-painted with figures in a landscape being viewed from an attendant in a window and a scholar’s studio with his desk visible through an open door.  Excellent condition. Chenghua mark on the bottom as well as an old Chait collection sticker. Circa 1640-1660.

 

Impressive 8″ Transitional/Kangxi Period Silver-Mounted Tea Caddy #7449

A fine piece of Chinese export Transitional/Kangxi period porcelain decorated in underglaze blue with a charming scene of three young children frolicking in a landscape as their mother proudly looks on. Beautifully potted, painted and glazed quality typical of this period. The marked silver top most likely Dutch and a later addition, complimenting the fine blue decoration, and allowing for what probably was a baluster vase to be transformed into a very impressive tea caddy. Measuring 8″ tall and in very good condition. Transitional/Kangxi period, circa 1640-1660.

 

 

Kangxi Period, Riot of Rotterdam Plate #7450

A beautifully rendered example of this well-known design-this Chinese export porcelain 8″ plate is decorated in underglaze blue with a scene from the “Riot of Rotterdam”.  As the story goes, a magistrate of the city passed an especially cruel and excessive verdict upon a local miscreant for a crime. So outraged were the citizens of the city over this miscarriage of justice that they rioted, attacked the magistrate’s house, and razed it to the ground. This act of public defiance to overbearing injustice became famous and was widely reported throughout Europe, the Dutch even struck a medallion to commemorate the action and it is from this medallion that the design for the plate was most likely taken. This is the first European historical event that is rendered upon a piece of Chinese porcelain. Dating to the Kangxi period, in very good condition, circa 1695-1700.

Pair of Kangxi Period Tea Bowls and Saucers #7445

A very fine pair of Kangxi Chinese export porcelain tea bowls and saucers, decorated in underglaze blue “penciled” designs, each piece laid out in stylized lotus petal panels, each panel with a tree and flower silhouette-all “penciled” in with lattice cross-hatching. Exquisitely thinly potted, with only very minute rim nibbles, very good condition, the saucers measuring 4 1/2″ in diameter.  Circa 1690.

Fine Pair of CA MAU Shipwreck Tea Bowls and Saucers #7437

 

A real treasure, truly, this beautifully intact pair of Chinese export porcelain tea bowls and saucers are part of the famous Ca Mau shipwreck cargo that was discovered in 1998 off the coast of south Vietnam. It was  the remains of an early 18th century Chinese junk carrying approximately 130,000 pieces of porcelain on it’s way from Canton to the Dutch port of Batavia (now Jakarta) when it sunk in about 1725. After the cargo was retrieved and catalogued, three Vietnamese museums chose what they wanted for their collections, the remaining 76,000 pieces were sold in a spectacular sale at Sotheby’s in Amsterdam in 2007 that garnered worldwide attention.  Pieces from this shipwreck, needless to say, are sometimes damaged or somewhat degraded having been under salt water for nearly three centuries, but these two examples remain in extraordinarily good condition, finely potted, charmingly hand-painted in underglaze blue, and with much of their original glaze more intact than what one usually sees on these shipwreck pieces. The saucers 4 1/2″ in diameter, the tea bowls 2 3/4″ in diameter. All pieces bearing the Sotheby’s sale stickers; an opportunity to own a piece of a time capsule of the China Trade.  Circa 1725.

Fine PAIR of 12 1/2″ Kangxi Chargers #7422

A very handsome pair of Chinese export Kanxgi period chargers, decorated in a rich cobalt blue with central roundels of scenes of a supplicant before a nobleman or court official surrounded by attendants.  Representations of the Four Seasons emanate from the central scene in the form of peony, prunus, chrysanthemum and lotus. The rim contains a border of continuous scenes depicting figures at leisure enjoying courtly and scholarly pursuits.  The reverse of these lovely pieces are equally beautiful, decorated with continuing floral motifs both on the rim as well as the cavetto. Measuring 12 1/2″ in diameter and in very good condition with only a minor rim chip to one charger. Beautifully painted. circa 1690.

 

Kangxi Period 11″ Charger #7396

A fine Chinese export porcelain 11″ charger, decorated in underglaze blue with a central design of scrolling peonies against a blue ground, the motif continuing around the rim which is painted with lotus petal-shaped panels with flowering branches of peony and diapering along a shaped edge. With very minor frits and glaze bubbles, otherwise very good condition. The reverse with a collection sticker from The Cowperthwaite Family Trust.  Circa 1690.

Extremely Rare Ming Period Duck-Form Censor #7388

An especially fine and rare Chinese export Ming period censor in the form of a standing duck. Decorated in underglaze blue, the top part of the figure lifting off for the incense (the smoke stains still within) and the incense rising through the duck’s open beak.  This is a remarkably rare form in remarkably good condition given its age with only glaze losses from wear . Measuring 6″ tall x 8″ wide. Circa 1600.

 

 

Very Fine Pair of Kangxi Plates #7369

A very fine pair of thinly potted Chinese export porcelain plates hand-painted in underglaze blue with images of waterfowl amongst lotus, the scenes unusually unrestricted by borders and covering the entire surface of the plate. Both representative of the level of quality one can expect from the Kangxi period. One with a faint hairline from the rim, otherwise both in very good condition. Measuring 8 1/4″ in diameter. Circa 1690.

Early Jia-Jinq /Wanli 14″ Charger #7368

A boldly decorated Chinese export porcelain dish charger hand-painted in deep underglaze blue with two central figures, a kylin and an elephant, beneath a tree, surrounded within an outer border of swirling dragons alternating with roundels of  four of the eight trigrams of Bagua symbolism. The trigrams are symbolic of naturally occuring processes and inter-related basic principles of reality, balance and equilibrium. Each one can be associated with a particular family member, season, personality trait, direction or animal; the three represented on this charger stand for water, lake, heaven and fire.  The reverse with floral and foliate roundels around the rim border and centered with a calligraphic mark. Measuring 13 1/4″ in diameter and with a small chip to the foot rim and some pitting and grit to the glaze all typical of a piece of this early production. A fine early example, circa 1580.