American Market ‘Arms of Alexander’ Plate #4649

A very interesting piece of Chinese export porcelain relating to an American General in the Revolution. This plate is from a service made for Major General William Alexander (1726-1783). Born in New York, he was a distant relation of the Earl Stirling, and when that line ‘died out’ he petitioned Parliament before the war to claim the title. Despite never having been granted that petition, he nonetheless fashioned himself the ‘Earl of Stirling’ and as was customary at the time, ordered an armorial service¬† bearing the Arms of Alexander quartering MacDonald which is finely rendered here on this plate, a central shield with ‘Wild Man’ and ‘Mermaid’ supporters. Sadly, hostilities broke out and the service probably never got beyond the East India warehouses in London before William Alexander died in 1783. Despite his aspirations to a noble title, Alexander went on to have a very impressive military record for the American cause serving in New York and New Jersey as well as at Valley Forge, Brandywine, German town and Philadelphia, being made a Major General in 1777.¬† Measuring 9″ in diameter and in very good condition, dating to circa 1775.

Brown Fitzhugh Monogrammed Dish #7400 SOLD

A fine Chinese export porcelain saucer dish meticulously rendered in the Brown Fitzhugh pattern, undoubtedly from a special order service, with the central roundel bearing as yet unidentified initial B. The quality of the hand-painting is so good as to resemble transfer-printed wares. Lovely condition, measuring 8″ in diameter, with a Henry Moog provenance and dating to circa 1820.

 

Great Pair of Pseudo-Tobacco Leaf Plates #7392

From a collection we have at present, this fine pair of Chinese export porcelain dinner plates are meticulously hand-painted in the exuberant Pseudo-Tobacco Leaf pattern with rich foliate and floral designs. Measuring 9″ in diameter, in very good condition, and dating to circa 1760-1780.

 

 

 

 

18th Century Mandarin Cup and Saucer #7386c

A finely decorated Chinese export porcelain handled cup and saucer beautifully painted with Mandarin scenes in reserve against diapered ground. Very nice quality, and in good condition, the saucer 4 3/4″ in diameter. Qianlong period, circa 1770.

Extremely Rare Ming Period Duck-Form Censor #7388

An especially fine and rare Chinese export Ming period censor in the form of a standing duck. Decorated in underglaze blue, the top part of the figure lifting off for the incense (the smoke stains still within) and the incense rising through the duck’s open beak.¬† This is a remarkably rare form in remarkably good condition given its age with only glaze losses from wear . Measuring 6″ tall x 8″ wide. Circa 1600.

 

 

Very Fine Pair of Kangxi Plates #7369

A very fine pair of thinly potted Chinese export porcelain plates hand-painted in underglaze blue with images of waterfowl amongst lotus, the scenes unusually unrestricted by borders and covering the entire surface of the plate. Both representative of the level of quality one can expect from the Kangxi period. One with a faint hairline from the rim, otherwise both in very good condition. Measuring 8 1/4″ in diameter. Circa 1690.

Rare Pair of Spaniel Figures #7353 SOLD

A very rare pair of Chinese export porcelain figures modeled as a pair of recumbent Spaniels, of both impressive size and provenance. The figures with their charming faces and soft mottled coats are cast in mirror images and are of larger size than one usually sees in this form. They measure 6 3/4″ tall and 10″ wide and they were used as the model for the copies in the Mottahedeh Collection, in addition to having been in the private collection of Nelson and Happy Rockefeller. Their condition is very good with only very minor losses to the tips of two paws. Qianlong period, late 18th century.

Unusual Centennial ‘Declaration of Independence’ Spoon #7377

A very unusual Chinese export porcelain spoon, made for the American market, depicting a scene with Founding Fathers at the signing of the Declaration of Independence, beneath a spread eagle, taken from a Currier and Ives print, after John Trumbull’s original painting of the scene. This is from a small, rare group of Chinese export porcelain undoubtedly special-ordered, that was created sometime in the late 19th century, after the American Centennial and part of the Colonial Revival movement. Measuring 9″ long and in good condition. Discussed and illustrated in Schiffer’s China for America, page 144.

Great Set of Chinese Immortals Figures #7375

A very fine set of Chinese export porcelain figures depicting “The Eight Immortals”, a legendary group from Chinese mythology, revered by Taoists and throughout Chinese culture. Each Immortal’s power can be transferred to a vessel that can bestow life or destroy evil. The group here is depicted with a ninth character, their leader, Shou Lao, and they are all well-modeled with individual personalities and well-detailed, each holding his attribute and standing on matching plinths, all decorated in exuberant famille rose enamels. Many times these sets are made up of assembled characters, but given the consistency of design, decoration and matching plinths, we believe this to be an original complete group. In very good condition, each Immortal measuring 9″ tall and waiting to bestow life and destroy evil in your home. Late 19th/early 20 century.