Impressive 8″ Transitional/Kangxi Period Silver-Mounted Tea Caddy #7449

A fine piece of Chinese export Transitional/Kangxi period porcelain decorated in underglaze blue with a charming scene of three young children frolicking in a landscape as their mother proudly looks on. Beautifully potted, painted and glazed quality typical of this period. The marked silver top most likely Dutch and a later addition, complimenting the fine blue decoration, and allowing for what probably was a baluster vase to be transformed into a very impressive tea caddy. Measuring 8″ tall and in very good condition. Transitional/Kangxi period, circa 1640-1660.

 

 

Kangxi Period, Riot of Rotterdam Plate #7450

A beautifully rendered example of this well-known design-this Chinese export porcelain 8″ plate is decorated in underglaze blue with a scene from the “Riot of Rotterdam”.  As the story goes, a magistrate of the city passed an especially cruel and excessive verdict upon a local miscreant for a crime. So outraged were the citizens of the city over this miscarriage of justice that they rioted, attacked the magistrate’s house, and razed it to the ground. This act of public defiance to overbearing injustice became famous and was widely reported throughout Europe, the Dutch even struck a medallion to commemorate the action and it is from this medallion that the design for the plate was most likely taken. This is the first European historical event that is rendered upon a piece of Chinese porcelain. Dating to the Kangxi period, in very good condition, circa 1695-1700.

Chew Family of Philadelphia Pots de Creme #7443

A charming pair of Chinese export porcelain pots-de-creme, made for the American market, each hand-painted with a gilded sunburst design centered with the monogram C, from a service ordered for the CHEW family of Philadelphia, almost certainly Benjamin Chew (1722-1810). Benjamin, held numerous public offices and he and his very prominent family are fully discussed in Philadelphia and the China Trade, pages 44-52.  They kept a townhouse in Third Street in Philadelphia as well as a fine country estate named Cliveden in Gernmantown, which still stands today.  The sunburst motif seems to have been a locally favorite design as there are other Philadelphia area dinner services that were ordered with that motif. The pots-de-creme are in good condition, measuring 3 1/2″ tall, and exhibit a bit of molded detail both to the cover and around the base that one does not usually see on other plainer Export porcelain examples from the period. Circa 1795-1805.

Pair of Kangxi Period Tea Bowls and Saucers #7445

A very fine pair of Kangxi Chinese export porcelain tea bowls and saucers, decorated in underglaze blue “penciled” designs, each piece laid out in stylized lotus petal panels, each panel with a tree and flower silhouette-all “penciled” in with lattice cross-hatching. Exquisitely thinly potted, with only very minute rim nibbles, very good condition, the saucers measuring 4 1/2″ in diameter.  Circa 1690.

Elegant Yongzheng Famille Rose Plate #7451

A fine Chinese export porcelain Yongzheng period plate, hand-painted with Famille Rose enamels with a scene of a pair of pheasants perched amongst rockwork and flowering peony within a finely rendered gilded foliate cavetto, the rim with flowering branches and butterflies. The pheasant was the symbol of refinement and would have been a perfect choice of subject for such a refined piece as this with it’s muted tones and perfectly balanced white space-all so typical of the Yongzheng period. The plate measuring 9″ in diameter and, other than a Y-shaped line to the glaze on the reverse, it is in good condition. Circa 1730-35.

Fine Pair of CA MAU Shipwreck Tea Bowls and Saucers #7437

 

A real treasure, truly, this beautifully intact pair of Chinese export porcelain tea bowls and saucers are part of the famous Ca Mau shipwreck cargo that was discovered in 1998 off the coast of south Vietnam. It was  the remains of an early 18th century Chinese junk carrying approximately 130,000 pieces of porcelain on it’s way from Canton to the Dutch port of Batavia (now Jakarta) when it sunk in about 1725. After the cargo was retrieved and catalogued, three Vietnamese museums chose what they wanted for their collections, the remaining 76,000 pieces were sold in a spectacular sale at Sotheby’s in Amsterdam in 2007 that garnered worldwide attention.  Pieces from this shipwreck, needless to say, are sometimes damaged or somewhat degraded having been under salt water for nearly three centuries, but these two examples remain in extraordinarily good condition, finely potted, charmingly hand-painted in underglaze blue, and with much of their original glaze more intact than what one usually sees on these shipwreck pieces. The saucers 4 1/2″ in diameter, the tea bowls 2 3/4″ in diameter. All pieces bearing the Sotheby’s sale stickers; an opportunity to own a piece of a time capsule of the China Trade.  Circa 1725.

American Ship Tea Caddy and Cover #7418A Sold

A nice example of Chinese export porcelain made for the American market, this dome-shouldered tea caddy is hand-painted on both sides with an image of a three-masted ship under sail, proudly flying two American flags. Small restoration to cover and neck, otherwise good condition. Measuring 4 1/4″ tall x 3″ wide. Circa 1800.

Rare American Market “Cow Pox” 5 1/2″ Bowl #7434

A charming Chinese export porcelain 5 1/2″ bowl made for the American market, from a tea service ordered by Dr. Benjamin Waterhouse of Cambridge, MA. (1754-1846). Inscribed with the gilded initial W within a chain-link bordered roundel featuring the images of two cows in a pasture. The bucolic imagery was not only decorative but also an advertisement for innoculation by cowpox as a preventative vaccine against smallpox. Though the innoculation had been known since early in the 18th century, it was still a very controversial procedure (as it remains today). Dr. Waterhouse innoculated his own children with this method and commemorated the event with a special order tea set. Discussed and illustrated in Schiffer’s China for America, page 174. This bowl most likely the slop bowl from the tea set, with three lines restored, but charming imagery beautifully intact. Circa 1800.

Superb Kangxi Famille Jaune Figure of Guanyin #7436

A truly lovely and serene Chinese biscuit figure of Guanyin, the “Goddess of Mercy”, decorated in Famille Jaune enamels, beautifully modeled and molded-note her delicate face and the detailed necklace, ruyi scepter, and patterned robe.  Minor restoration at the wrist of one hand, a small potion of the ruyi handle; and one fingertip missing-otherwise beautiful condition. Measuring 9″ tall x 6″ wide. Kangxi period, circa 1700.

Spectacular Late Kangxi Famille Verte 15″ Punch Bowl #7395

A very fine Chinese export porcelain punch bowl of impressive 15″ size and decoration, hand-painted in Famille Verte enamels around the exterior with images of a pair of pheasants amongst rockwork and flowering branches of peony, the imagery of large, colorful and robust scale, highlighted with gilding; an iron red and gilded peony design centers the bottom of the interior. With a long line restored, otherwise in fine condition, perfect for a dramatic display. Circa 1720.